Compass Slapped With Lawsuit Over Website Access for the Blind

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe
With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

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Compass Slapped With Lawsuit Over Website Access for the Blind

Compass Slapped With Lawsuit Over Website Access for the Blind


December 31, 2018
admin

Discrimination lawsuit highlights legal risk for brokerages that don’t
comply with Americans with
Disabilities Act
by Teke Wiggin Staff Writer

Compass is being sued for allegedly failing to make its website fully
accessible to blind people, raising
the specter that real estate brokerages remain exposed to a legal risk about
which the National
Association of Realtors had previously warned members.

The suit, which is seeking class-action status and was filed on Dec. 12 in a
New York district court,
accuses Compass of violating the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for
“its failure to design,
construct, maintain, and operate its website to be fully accessible to and
independently usable by
Plaintiff and other blind or visually-impaired people.”

The complaint claims Compass’ website posed barriers to blind people,
including a lack of “alt-text,”
which screen-reading software can use to describe pictures to blind people,
as well as links that contain
no text.

Such challenges meant the plaintiff, who last visited Compass’ website in
October, was “unable to find
the locations and hours of operation of Defendant’s physical real estate
sales offices on its Website and
other important information, preventing Plaintiff from visiting the
locations to purchase items and to
view the items.”

The plaintiff is asking a judge to order Compass to make changes so that its
website “will become and
remain accessible to blind and visually-impaired people,” a process that the
plaintiff requests be
overseen by a consultant to help Compass comply with WCAG 2.0 guidelines.

WCAG 2.0 guidelines, created be the World Wide Web Consortium (known as
W3C), establish guidelines
for making websites accessible to blind people and “are universally followed
by most large business
entities and government agencies to ensure their websites are accessible,”
according to the complaint.

Compass said in a statement to Inman News that the brokerage “takes all
allegations involving
obligations to those with disabilities very seriously and we are carefully
investigating the matter.”

NAR has previously warned that both real estate agents and businesses face
liability over inaccessible
websites. NAR’s chief technology officer, Mark Lesswing, has said that
accessibility issues often relate to
menu navigation, clicking and images, the last of which he has said should
have “alt tags” that include
descriptions “with some particularity.”

Last year, the DOJ, advocacy groups and private plaintiffs were increasingly
pursuing enforcement
actions, demands and lawsuits related to website accessibility.

Redfin’s Walk Score was hit with a disability discrimination suit over
website accessibility in late May
2017. The case was dismissed with prejudice a month later.

Editor’s note: This story has been updated with a statement from Compass.

https://www.inman.com/2018/12/28/compass-slapped-with-lawsuit-over-website-access-for-the-blind/

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The power of social media

Greetings everyone! I’m Christian Robicheau and it seems as if fall may
just be making an early appearance!
We’ll just have to wait and see.
Today, I am delighted to share our president’s latest editorial with you and
for this week Donna J. Jodhan talks about her encounter with social media
and a lesson well learned.
I wish you a great weekend.

+++++++++++++++

The power of social media
By Donna J. Jodhan

I guess that I have probably under estimated the power of social media on
occasions. It is not to say that I was not paying attention in this
instance but when the instance pertained directly to me I simply failed to
take note in time.

True it is that I continue to witness how social media is becoming more and
more of a power house in our lives but for what it is worth; social media
can be viewed in so many different ways.

In my case, social media informed me of something and then I took what I
learned to come to a correct conclusion.

You see, I had to learn from certain posts on Facebook that changes were
being made at a company that I was working on contract for. At first, I did
not think much of the few posts that I read but when these posts intensified
it was time for me to pay more attention and I sure did.

To shorten the story; changes were happening and I was not going to be
included in these changes moving forward. In essence, my contract was not
being renewed and I seemed to be the last one to know.

I actually had to write to this company to ask for confirmation that my
contract was not being renewed. And they confirmed in a short and very off
hand manner.

Ah yes! The power of social media and I need to pay more attention or I
will stand to be caught napping!

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Two Canadian disability advocates on allowing themselves righteous anger

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Two Canadian disability advocates on allowing themselves righteous anger

Dorothy Ellen Palmer presents a frank discussion with Sarah Jama about the
challenges they face and
the solutions they’re fighting to see in Canada.

By Dorothy Ellen Palmer

From the United Church Observer, December 2018

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Back in 1964, when I proudly sewed stars onto the middy I wore to my weekly
Explorers meeting at
Alderwood United in Etobicoke, Ont., I couldn’t possibly have foreseen how a
girlhood

motto would shape my life as a disability activist. To share our
generational approaches to being “doers”
in the world, I met with Sarah Jama, a dynamic community organizer, and we
interviewed each other.

When you introduce yourself, what do you most want people to know?

Jama: I’m the co-founder of the Disability Justice
Network of Ontario, based in
Hamilton. I’m a 24-year-old community organizer who works on the
intersections of race and disability,
against all the forces in the universe (mainly capitalism and colonialism)
that try to tell me I have no
business existing. I’m a board member of the Afro-Canadian Caribbean
Association and have given over
100 talks on justice.

Palmer: I’m 63, a disabled writer, mom, binge knitter, retired drama teacher
and union activist. After
childhood surgeries on my feet to correct what were then called “birth
defects,” I walked unassisted
until my 40s. As I aged, I needed a crutch, then a walker. While disabled
people are
22
percent of the
population, I’m living proof that over a third of Canadians will be disabled
by the time they are older
than 65.

Was the choice to fight for disability justice linked to your childhood,
family or faith?

Jama: As a Black woman with a visible disability who grew up in a
single-parent household, I faced so
many barriers that I internalized.
Doctors insisted I repeat botched surgeries for reasons that were more about
aesthetics than quality of
life. Teachers told me I’d never make it to university. Strangers applauded
my friends for being friends
with someone like me. Authority figures told me the bullying was all in my
mind. I never learned that
being the way I was was normal. Growing up this way causes a complacency of
the soul. You believe
there is no issue worth fighting, because your existence is the root cause.

My thinking shifted in Grade 12, when a classmate in a wheelchair mentioned
he wanted to attend a
school of the arts in Toronto, but it didn’t have an elevator. In that
moment, I stepped out of my
individual experience and self-blame, and I allowed myself to get angry that
a publicly funded school
prevented my friend from reaching for the stars. This experience was the
first of many that got me
thinking about systemic inequality in ways that made me yearn for justice on
more than an individual
level.

Unless we learn to take care of the most vulnerable, those who aren’t seen
as beneficial to the state in
terms of cash flow, we will never build a better world.

Palmer: It is so interesting to hear you, Sarah, talk about internalizing
shame and not permitting yourself
a righteous anger. I did that for years.
Despite being raised in the United Church, which believes in equality, I
never felt equal. My shame came
from my limp, my ugly orthopedic oxfords and feeling like an outsider in my
family. I channelled my
anger into fighting for everybody but me. I’m adopted, and I helped other
adoptees search for their birth
families, but couldn’t do so myself.

When language changed, I changed. When “handicapped” became “disabled,” I
had an identity, not just
a diagnosis. When I heard the term “internalized ableism,” I could name the
shame that silenced me. As
an intersectional feminist, I saw that “abled privilege” normalizes, values
and rewards abled people.

A decade ago, when I first heard the term “decolonize disability,” I
realized I’d believed the lie that tells
us if we aren’t fit workers and consumers, we’re worthless. When I
discovered the international disabled
community on social media, they helped me understand that I’m “multiply
marginalized” – a disabled
senior living below the poverty line in one of the richest countries on
Earth. That’s when I finally stopped
feeling ashamed and alone and claimed my righteous anger.

For three decades, the motto of the disability community has been “Nothing
about us without us.” How
is this critical today?

Jama: Unless we learn to take care of the most vulnerable, those who aren’t
seen as beneficial to the
state in terms of cash flow, we will never build a better world. We’ll
continue to hunt, harm, bomb and
destroy people and lands viewed as “the other.” We’ll continue to engage in
modern eugenics, the
practice of deciding who deserves to live and who doesn’t, through funding
decisions by the state. This
includes funding childhood disability programs but not enough adult
programs. It includes a lack of
accessible affordable housing and the wrongful imprisonment of people with
disabilities.

When Doug Ford, who is now Ontario’s premier,
spoke against a group home in 2014, he said, “Anyone who wants
to criticize, I’d be more
than happy to take their address, and we’ll put the house right next door to
them and see how they like
it.” This language is used throughout history to dehumanize those who some
believe are unworthy of a
quality life. But the colonial state has not, cannot and will not exist
without people with disabilities. We
have always existed and must begin to take the helm in pushing for justice.

Palmer: As a disabled writer, I know representation matters. In fair
representation, 14 percent of
Canadian books would be by disabled authors; today, it’s closer to three
percent. This is the result of a
CanLit run by abled writers, abled agents, abled editors and abled
publishers, who value and perpetuate
abled voices. Most retreats, readings, festivals, launches, bookstores and
literary events are inaccessible,
with barriers at the door, a stage with stairs and inaccessible washrooms.
We can’t take a seat at the
table if we can’t get to the table. When abled writers appropriate disabled
experience, they typically
produce “inspiration porn”: tales in which disabled folks either “bravely
overcome” disability or
obligingly die. The presence of disabled people and stories of disabled
lives are essential components in
building the united, inclusive front we need.

www.ucobserver.org/justice/2018/12/disability_activism/

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Onley’s long road to accessibility a lesson for us all

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Onley’s long road to accessibility a lesson for us all

Martin Regg Cohn OPINION

The Toronto Star February 9, 2019

We all complain, habitually and self-pityingly, about punishing snowfalls.
Especially lately.
But for David Onley, the snow banks and other barriers never truly melt
away.

For a time, as Ontario’s lieutenant-governor, the obstacles were magically
cleared away. Enveloped by an entourage, cocooned by bodyguards, he
surmounted the roadblocks.

An elevator was installed in the vice-regal suite at Queen’s Park, and a
ramp was retrofitted in front of the legislature. Thanks to the superhuman
powers emanating from the Crown – which he embodied from 2007-14 – Onley not
only made his way, but also paved the way for other wheelchair-bound
Ontarians.

Ensconced in his scooter, chauffeured in a specially outfitted van, backed
by his band of official enablers, his disability – or inaccessibility –
seemingly diminished. But after a lifetime spent grappling with the fallout
from a childhood bout of polio, Onley always knew it was only a matter of
time before he was on his own again.

Now, Onley no longer speaks for the Crown. But he still has a voice.

He is using it to describe what he sees at ground level – and getting a
hearing from the powers above. Appointed last year by Queen’s Park to
conduct a formal review of accessibility in Ontario, he has just submitted
his findings to the Progressive Conservative government.

There is still a stunning disconnect for the disabled, and a growing gap in
how the able-bodied perceive the reality of inaccessibility.

Onley wouldn’t tip his hand about the details of his report, which will be
shared with the public later. But he didn’t disguise his disappointment.

“We still have a very inaccessible society, a built environment that is very
inaccessible,” he told me. “The people who believe it’s accessible are
members of the able-bodied population.”

A longtime believer in the original legislation, which passed with all-party
support, he now fears that its 2025 target for full accessibility will go
unfulfilled.

Onley points a finger not only at politicians but bureaucrats, architects,
developers, administrators and inspectors who fail to do their duty to the
disabled.

And all of us. For the disabled are us, sooner or later.

The older we get – and our population is aging fast – the more likely we are
to find ourselves in their shoes: First with canes, then walkers, then
wheelchairs.

Eligible, ultimately, for those special parking permits in our windshields
that confer priority access to reserved spots. Paradoxically, the advent of
priority parking has helped to distort the reality of disability today in
Ontario.

Those signs are ubiquitous, serving as a symbol of access and open doors.
But the typical reserved parking spot is a dead end – leading only to
barriers that leave the disabled out in the cold at most malls and public
buildings.

“It’s shocking the number of places that are fully inaccessible and yet out
front, you’ll see a wheelchair sign,” he said. “It depends on how angry you
want to be.”

The problem isn’t just the false signal it sends to the disabled on the
spot, but the facade it conveys to society at large that access is
everywhere.

Onley is especially vexed by the lack of foresight from the self-styled
visionaries who make up the architectural community. He points to new
buildings that win architectural awards but get a failing grade for
accessibility, which should surely disqualify them from recognition.

Over the years, I had watched Onley’s handlers help him navigate unforeseen
obstacles and predictable impediments. This week, I watched him flying solo
again, when he wended his way to a Ryerson University democracy forum I
hosted for Onley and his successor as lieutenant-governor, Elizabeth
Dowdeswell: A Conversation with the Crown.

Without government officials to smooth the way, it fell to Ryerson
organizers to ensure that he didn’t stumble on his journey. In preparation,
Onley patiently walked me through his detailed checklist to overcome any
obstacles.

Yes, they had a ramp leading onto the stage, but had they verified its
dimensions to ensure his scooter could mount the slope? Was the platform
wide enough for him to pre-position without toppling over? Any stairs along
the way leading to the campus venue?

Where was the nearest parking? Was it underground or at least sheltered? Was
there an underground passageway leading to the event? If not (and there
wasn’t), what about the weather? Who would shovel any snow in the way?

Presciently, as it turns out, Onley reminded me of the perils of ice and
snow for someone in a scooter. Even a few centimetres can gum up his wheels,
and a serious snow bank is a dead end.

Even before Toronto’s unexpected 20-centimetre snowfall that came after our
chat, Onley had confided that he typically refuses all winter speaking
engagements – too unpredictable and insurmountable. But he was making a rare
exception to be with his successor, Dowdeswell.

Practiced in both logistics and logic, Onley made it onstage without a
hitch, and expounded on vice-regal arcana without a verbal stumble.

While it’s always an education hearing him talk about the abstractions of
our constitution, he also delivers enduring lessons on the reality of
inaccessibility.

https://www.thestar.com/politics/political-opinion/2019/02/08/david-onleys-long-road-to-accessibility-for-the-disabled-is-a-lesson-for-all-of-us-as-we-age-into-walkers-and-wheelchairs.html

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The last minute syndrome

Greetings and I’m Scott Savoy here to kick off the month of September with
you!
It has been a long hot summer but very pleasant in so many ways!
Today, I am pleased to share our president’s editorial with you and for this
week Donna J. Jodhan expresses her concern over the the last minute
syndrome!
I wish you a great weekend and encourage you to read on!

+++++++++++++++

The last minute syndrome
By Donna J. Jodhan

I know that we are living in an ever growing busy world where we are all
doing our best to meet our commitments and our schedules. However, with all
of this comes what I call the ever increasing problem/concern of the last
minute syndrome.

I for one have never been able to adequately deal with last minute requests.
And I mean very last minute requests especially when I feel that these last
minute requests could have been avoided if better scheduling and planning
had been carried out.

Sure! There are always going to be last minute requests made when
unexpected circumstances arise but take this as an example.

You know that you are going on holidays starting on a specific date or you
know that there are deadlines to be met. Then why is it that one would come
with a very last minute request to make changes to a report or to squeeze
something new into the schedule?

I am all for accommodating and assisting in times of tight corners but I
think that it is very disrespectful and downright inconsiderate when someone
knowing their deadlines and schedules would ask another to do the above.

The last minute syndrome has a domino affect in that one request means that
another needs to change their own schedule and so on down the chain.

I know only too well that circumstances such as a sudden death or illness or
an emergency due to something else unexpected can attribute to a last minute
request but in general there is much that we can all do to help deal with or
curtail the last minute syndrome.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

AppleVis unlimited August 2019

Welcome to the August 2019 edition of AppleVis Unlimited, our monthly series which aims to highlight
what’s new and noteworthy on the AppleVis website. Below, you’ll find a selection of the best content posted to AppleVis by members of the community – from new app entries, to app updates, to the latest news and podcasts. For easier navigation, the major sections of this post are at heading level 3, and each individual item is at heading level 4.
New and Noteworthy App Entries
1.1.1.1: Faster Internet (iOS, Free)
1.1.1.1 – the world’s fastest and safest DNS resolver –
1.1.1.1, the privacy-first DNS resolver is now available on the go. No one should be able
to snoop on what you do on the Internet. We’ve created 1.1.1.1 so that you can connect
to the Internet securely anytime, anywhere.
* Greater privacy
By using a secure connection, 1.1.1.1 makes sure no one can snoop your
DNS queries.
Some ISPs use your DNS queries to sell your data. Cloudflare will never
sell your data or use it to target ads. Period.
* Fastest way to experience the Internet
1.1.1.1 makes the Internet faster by using Cloudflare’s global network.
On average, we are 28% faster than the next fastest public resolver.
* Easy to use
One-touch setup to make your Internet more safe and private.
Install it today, get faster Internet, it’s that simple.
Best of all: No upsells, no in-app purchases, and free for life. Website owners pay us to
make your Internet faster so you don’t have to.

Current Version: 2.0.9 (June 18, 2019)
Read 1.1.1.1: Faster Internet’s AppleVis App Directory entry for more information
https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/utilities/1111-faster-internet
Visit 1.1.1.1: Faster Internet’s App Store page
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/1-1-1-1-faster-internet/id1423538627

2. Calca (macOS, US$4.99)
Calca is a powerful symbolic calculator that updates as you type giving you instant
answers. It solves equations and simplifies complex expressions. It’s also a rich
Markdown text editor so that you can explain your ideas alongside your calculations.
Calca is perfect for professionals and students – anyone who works with numbers and
equations. Variables and functions can be created with only a few keystrokes and can be
manipulated with a rich library of operators and functions.
Calca updates as you type – just like a spreadsheet. You can declare variables, edit their
values and watch everything update before your eyes. Since everything is calculated on
the device – no network needed – you get answers instantaneously.
All calculations are stored as plain text so you can easily share them with other editors
and move them from device to device. Calca has been designed to work with iCloud
documents so all your devices can access your calculations – you’ll always have the latest
files ready for viewing and editing.
Calca comes with a suite of examples to help you get started covering topics from home
mortgages to kinetics. All these examples are fully explained within Calca itself.
Are you still using a desktop calculator? Are you using the silly calculator with the giant
buttons that came with your OS? Computers are much more capable than doing simple
one-line arithmetic – put your machine to work with Calca!
Calculation Features:
* Variables x = 42
* Functions f(c) = 9/5*c + 32 and even recursive functions
* Units 42 mph in kmph and currency •599 in $
* Solves equations (x + 2x + 4x = 42, what is x?)
* Matrices with inverses so you can solve linear equations
* Sum, prod, map, and reduce operations on lists, matrices, and ranges
* Trigonometry and complex numbers
* Derivatives of functions
* Logic operations and if statements
* Binary math (& and |) and support for binary and hex number (0xA9 and
0b1010)
* Keeps track of units (m, s, m/s, m/s2, etc.) so you can verify your equations as
you compute

Current Version: 1.5 (October 19, 2018)
Read Calca’s AppleVis App Directory entry for more information
https://www.applevis.com/apps/mac/productivity/calca
Visit Calca’s App Store page
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/calca/id635758264?ign-mpt=uo%3D8&mt=12

3. Circus Master’s Revenge (iOS, Free With In-App Purchases)
There’s been a big hole in the visually impaired gaming community for quite a long time.
Their craving for that game, which they can call their own, is now over. Mental Vision
LLC has created such game, that can fill this void in this community. Circus Master’s
Revenge is here.
An epic non-graphic binaural battle of circus freaks, which you will never forget & which
will need you to have tremendous courage in order to defend yourself. Beware, the
circus master is definitely not very friendly. Like most antagonists, he tries to hurt your
feelings as often as possible to throw you off your game. Hopefully, his insults will
enforce you to focus on the enemy. Good luck to anyone who is up to the challenge.
Hope, you enjoy it.

Current Version: 1.0 (August 16, 2019)
Read Circus Master’s Revenge’s AppleVis App Directory entry for more information
https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/games/circus-master-s-revenge
Visit Circus Master’s Revenge’s App Store page
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/circus-masters-revenge/id1374289562

4. Invisible Dragons (iOS, Free)
The age of the Ice Apocalypse has begun.
The world falls into absolute darkness and everything is frozen to death. Everything
except the Dragon Eggs.
Create your Dragon empire and try to survive.
Invisible Dragons is a unique text based strategy about ice and fire, dragons and gold,
spells and rituals. Stay in touch with your magic world through the interactive
notification and get the full experience from your Apple Watch.

Current Version: 1.3 (July 19, 2016)
Read Invisible Dragons’ AppleVis App Directory entry for more information
https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/games/invisible-dragons
Visit Invisible Dragons’ App Store page
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/invisible-dragons/id1073578968

5. MasterBrain (iOS, US$0.99)
Based on the popular MasterMind, this game consists in finding out the combination of
randomly generated colors for each game bearing in mind that no color is repeated in
the solution. The play screen contains a horizontal row of buttons that depending on the
selected level Will have for, five or six buttons.
Additionally, on the upper right side of the screen the play button launches the selected
color combination, (this can also be achieved by a double tap with two fingers), and on
the upper left side the back button interrupts the current game and returns to the start
screen.
Information about each play, displayed between both buttons on the upper part of the
screen Will help infer the solution. the colors of the game buttons, can be switched by
swiping up or down on them to set the desired combination and launch a new play by
tapping the play button.
Two modes of information display are available which can the toggled at the setting
screen:
text mode: enumerates de numbers of items well placed, incorrectly placed and not
presents.
Emoji mode: information is displayed with emojis, ?, well placed, ? incorrectly placed
and ? not present.
The result is also revealed by means of different sounds.
Higher levels are unlocked when scoring above 0.

Read MasterBrain’s AppleVis App Directory entry for more information
https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/entertainment/masterbrain
Visit MasterBrain’s App Store page
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/masterbrain/id1468521180

6 Planet Life: A curious planet adventure (iOS, Free With In-App Purchases)
In Planet Life you are born again as a planet. Being a planet in space can be very lonely,
but fortunately there is life out there.
Search the corners of the universe, for new friends, who will help you on your quest to
become a happy little place to live. Manage your resources, and upgrade tools to
advance.
Fight your way down a deep deep dungeon leading to the core of yourself, and gain the
respect of mysterious space gods.

Current Version: 2.0.3 (June 20, 2019)
Read Planet Life: A curious planet adventure’s AppleVis App Directory entry for
more information
https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/games/planet-life-curious-planet-adventure
Visit Planet Life: A curious planet adventure’s App Store page
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/planet-life/id1389159829

7. TonalEnergy Tuner & Metronome (iOS, US$3.99)
For musicians from pros to beginners, whether you sing, play a brass, woodwind or
stringed instrument or any type of guitar, this app provides a set of feature-rich practice
tools that gives fun and rewarding feedback. Itís much more than just a tuner!
So what makes the TonalEnergy the best selling music practice app?
* It’s an all-in-one app, with a state-of-the-art tuner, an advanced metronome,
dedicated orchestral strings and guitar tuning page, a piano keyboard, sound
analysis pages, and audio/visual recording capabilities.
* It’s easy to use. Options like the Target Tuner or Pitch Tracker are on all the
main pages. TonalEnergy helps users create rewarding and attainable goals
during a rehearsal or when working alone. Colorful analysis data pages and
audio/video recording features enhance the experience of practice.
* The metronome is cutting edge. It offers unmatched flexibility in sound choices,
tempo settings, meters, subdivision patterns and visual displays. Voice count-
ins, the ability to create and edit preset groups and Ableton link for syncing
multiple devices make this a superior tool for performers.
* Ear training possibilities are endless. The high quality multi-sampled instrument
sounds for symphonic instruments are unique among all other tuning
applications. Listening skills can be developed through the use of the eight-
octave keyboard, chromatic wheel and tone generator. There are no other
sounds like these.
* Learning is a social activity. Using features unique to the TonalEnergy Tuner,
data can be collected, reviewed, edited and shared with others. Feedback is
essential for growing and developing great performers. It’s all about
connectivity.
FEATURES
* Recognizes a large pitch range, extending to lower registers than many
competing tuners (C0 – C8) that is highly responsive to wind instruments, as well
as acoustic and electric string instruments
* Adjustable A=440 Hz reference
* Automatic or manual transposing options
* Instantly changes between equal, just and other custom temperaments,
including user-defined ones
* Auto or instant pitch reference note feature using the TonalEnergy sounds
* Extensive tuning list for all orchestral string and fretted string instruments
including many more features than most other string-only tuner apps
* An expandable eight octave piano keyboard enhancing many of the key aspects
of the tuner’s functions
* Chromatic wheel tone generator, with optional auto-vibrato feature
* Frequency and Harmonic energy overtone graphs, along with a multi-function
waveform
* Dedicated metronome page that matches or exceeds the features available on
all other stand alone metronome apps
* Notation options including standard English, Solfege, Northern European, and
Indian variants
* Bluetooth output/input support
* Audio and Video recording capabilities including, editing, looping, timestretch
that are all exportable via iTunes sharing, AirDrop, email, AudioCopy,
SoundCloud, etc
* Import music from iTunes Library or email attachments
* Compatible with external microphones and clip-on vibration sensor devices
* Supports external video output to an external display for use in rehearsal halls
* External MIDI keyboard control support
* Apple Watch app acts as remote control for the phone app
* Audiobus and inter-app audio support
* VoiceOver support for the blind or visually impaired
INSTRUMENT SOUNDS
* Piccolo, Flute
* Oboe, English Horn, Bassoon
* Eb, Bb/A Clarinet, Bass Clarinet
* Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Baritone Saxophone
* Trumpet
* French Horn
* Tenor and Bass Trombone
* Euphonium and Tuba
* Square, sawtooth, and sine waveforms
* Organ
* Plucked Strings

Current Version: 1.7.2 (August 14, 2019)
Read TonalEnergy Tuner & Metronome’s AppleVis App Directory entry for more
information
https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/music/tonalenergy-tuner-metronome
Visit TonalEnergy Tuner & Metronome’s App Store page
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/tonalenergy-tuner-metronome/id497716362

8. Venture Zone Global (iOS, US$0.99)
The Venture Zone Global was created with sight loss in mind and it’s fully accessible.
Anyone can play, including sighted individuals.
In the Venture Zone Global, you will:
* create and name your own company
* choose products to sell based on different price points
* raise virtual cash with seed funding, a bank loan or friends and family
If youíre a beginner, turn on tutorial mode and a narrator will guide you through the
game and teach you about the world of business.

Current Version: 1.0 (August 1, 2019)
Read Venture Zone Global’s AppleVis App Directory entry for more information
https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/games/venture-zone-global
Visit Venture Zone Global’s App Store page
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/venture-zone-global/id1469551504

9. YouDescribe (iOS, Free)
The YouDescribe app gives blind and visually-impaired viewers convenient mobile access
to a rapidly growing collection of YouTube videos with audio description ñ an extra
soundtrack added by a describer to tell the viewer about text, illustrations, setting,
gestures and facial expressions that are otherwise not accessible to blind viewers, or to
otherwise aid viewers who benefit from additional description to understand the video
content. The YouDescribe app for iOS lets you choose from thousands of YouTube
videos described by our global community of contributors. The app also lets you request
descriptions for YouTube videos that have not yet been described, and rate descriptions
that have already been created.
YouDescribe is free and easy to use from the iOS app or from the desktop. The app has
been extensively tested with the VoiceOver screenreader, and the web site works well
with a variety of screen reader/browser combinations.

Current Version: 1.0.1 (January 31, 2018)
Read YouDescribeís AppleVis App Directory entry for more information
https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/photo-and-video/youdescribe
Visit YouDescribeís App Store page
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/youdescribe/id1177344886

All recent app entries posted to AppleVis can be found at:
iOS
https://www.applevis.com/apps/latest?type=ios_app_directory
Mac
https://www.applevis.com/apps/latest?type=mac_app_directory
Apple Watch
https://www.applevis.com/apps/latest?type=apple_watch_app_directory
Apple TV
https://www.applevis.com/apps/latest?type=apple_tv_app_directory

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Airline Fined for Separate Disabled-Accessible Website

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Airline Fined for Separate Disabled-Accessible Website

December 14, 2018

Greg Thomson

December 13, 2018
Jesse M. Brody

Offering a separate website for those with disabilities does not comply with
the U.S. Department of
Transportation’s (DOT) website accessibility requirements, the agency made
clear with a $200,000 fine
to the Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS).

The DOT established website accessibility requirements that require any U.S.
or foreign air carrier that has a website and that operates at least one
aircraft seating more than 60
passengers to ensure that its public-facing webpages on its primary website
are accessible to individuals
with disabilities. Set forth at 14 CFR Part 382, the rule had two phases of
implementation.

By December 12, 2015, covered entities needed to ensure that core travel
information and services on
the airline’s primary website met the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines
2.0 Level AA Standard.
Airlines had until December 12, 2016, to achieve compliance for all
remaining webpages on the primary
site.

But in February 2017, the DOT’s Office of Aviation Enforcement and
Proceedings discovered that SAS’
primary website was not accessible to persons with disabilities. Instead,
the airline created an “assistive
version” of its primary website at a separate and distinct URL.

This separate site violated the DOT rule, the agency said.

“In the preamble to the rule the Department explained that to create a
separate accessible website
would ‘likely perpetuate the problem of unequal access as carriers allot
fewer resources than needed
over time to properly maintain the second site,'” according to the DOT
consent order with SAS.
“The Department also stated that it is a ‘well-established principle of
disability non-discrimination law
that separate or different aids, benefits or services can only be provided
to individuals with disabilities
(or a class of such individuals) when necessary to provide aids, benefits or
service that are as effective as
those provided to others.'”

SAS’ failure to comply also constituted unfair and deceptive practices and
an unfair method of
competition, the agency said.

In response, SAS argued it “held a good faith belief” that the assistive
version of its website was a
conforming alternate version that brought its primary site into compliance,
pointing the finger at a third-
party vendor that “assured” the airline the alternative site met the
requirements of the DOT rule. SAS no
longer has an alternative separate website designed for individuals with
disabilities, and its primary
website is accessible.

The DOT Enforcement Office and SAS reached an agreement over the charges.
While the airline did not admit to the violations asserted by the agency, it
agreed to cease and desist
from future similar violations and pay a compromise civil penalty of
$200,000. Of the total amount,
$100,000 was due immediately, with the remaining $100,000 due and payable if
SAS violates the
consent order within one year.

“This compromise assessment is appropriate considering the nature and extent
of the violations
described herein and serves the public interest,”
according to the consent order. “It represents a strong deterrent to future
similar unlawful practices by
SAS and other carriers.”

To read the DOT’s consent order, visit
https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=DOT-OST-2018-0001-0017 .

Why it matters

Website operators have struggled over the years with accessibility
requirements, but the DOT consent
order makes one thing very clear: A separate accessible website designed for
individuals with disabilities
is not an option

https://www.manatt.com/Insights/Newsletters/Advertising-Law/Airline-Fined-fo
r-Separate-Disabled-Accessible-Web

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Different worlds – the sighted and the blind

Greetings and I’m Christian Robicheau here to close off the month of August
2019.
Today, I am pleased to share our president’s weekly editorial with you and
for this week Donna J. Jodhan zooms in on the differences between the world
of the sighted and that of the blind and vision impaired person.
We wish you a great Labor Day holiday weekend; the final holiday weekend of
the summer.

+++++++++++++++

Different worlds
By Donna J. Jodhan

I think that for today I am going to say that when it comes to a perceived
lack of understanding between generations, and between the sighted and non
sighted world, much of the problem could just probably stem from what we
would refer to as two different worlds.

Of course, there may be other reasons but to me it may be the easiest reason
or excuse. When it comes to different generations; we may want to blame it
on the age gap or age difference. For why else then do we often see a lack
of understanding between generations? More precisely, for such things as a
lack of appreciation for values, commitment, dedication, and more?

When it comes to the differing worlds between the sighted and non sighted
world; it may be that the problem could lie in the walk a mile in my shoes
syndrome. The sighted world does not understand the non sighted world
simply because they are not blind or vision impaired and on the other hand
the non sighted world does not understand the sighted world because of the
same reason.

When one has never experienced a certain circumstance it may come down to
saying that it would be hard to assume and expect that one cannot understand
if one has not experienced.

They often say that age normally brings reason; so then should we expect
that these two different worlds would change once this new generation grows
up? And in the case of the sighted versus the non sighted world, it may be
a bit more to expect as there are both artificial and real barriers for us
to consider.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

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UK Shortbread firm introduces braille to cartons – this is progress

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

UK Shortbread firm introduces braille to cartons – this is progress
Europe, February 8 2012
UK shortbread manufacturer, Paterson Arran Limited, has introduced braille
to its best-selling shortbread range, as part of its ongoing commitment to
meeting the needs of consumers.
Braille has been added to the product descriptor and nutritional information
on some of Paterson’s best-selling product ranges, including Shortbread
Fingers (380g) and a new Shortbread and Biscuits assortment (185g), which
was launched last Christmas.
Shortbread FingersPaterson Arran is the first branded shortbread
manufacturer to add braille to its packaging. While only currently featured
on the special occasion range, the company is hoping to roll it out further
to all new carton products in the future.
The braille packs are listed nationwide throughout multiple and independent
retailers, to aid blind and partially sighted customers.
Amy Coles, Marketing Manager at Paterson Arran said: “We are always looking
for ways to satisfy customer demands and featuring braille on our
best-selling shortbread is a useful way of meeting the needs of blind and
partially sighted consumers.
Fazilet Haidi, RNIB’s Group Director of Inclusive Society, said; “Going food
shopping can be fraught with difficulties for blind and partially sighted
consumers, from getting round the store to selecting and purchasing goods.
RNIB welcomes the move from Paterson Arran to include braille on food
packaging, as blind and partially sighted consumers should be supported to
shop independently.
“In fact, we believe that food manufacturers are missing a trick as anything
that improves the labelling of food, in braille or clear print, would
benefit the UK’s two million consumers with visual disabilities. We hope
that other food manufacturers follow suit.
“RNIB is delighted with initiatives which improve the shopping experience
for blind and partially sighted customers.”
Source: http://www.worldbakers.com
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The real reason or excuse?

The real reason or excuse?
By Donna J. Jodhan
Call me a bit paranoid but as I sit writing this particular editorial; I
feel as if I am becoming even more so. I simply find that if you have the
time to dig a bit deeper you will find that reasons are not really reasons
but instead they are excuses.

There used to be a time when reasons were reasons but these days with
everyone having much more on their plate and not enough time to either
complete commitments or may be not planning enough time to complete them, we
are finding ourselves becoming more paranoid, experiencing more stress, and
scrambling to find ways to plug holes and leaks.

Here are some very popular reasons/excuses that I have been experiencing
over the last year.
“I did not get your emails.”
Well, no real way to prove this to be true so blame this on technology if
you will.

“I have been really sick and in hospital so could not respond.”
Again, no way to prove this. it may be true but then I have first hand
knowledge to the contrary that the person proffering this reason/excuse was
hiding behind this.
It was so bad that the story grew more and more humorous as they continued
to build on the reason/excuse.

“I was out of town and did not have access to my emails.”
I would say to this that maybe you could have found the time to let the
intended receiver know that you were going to be out of town before you
left.
If communication was important to you then you would have found time to let
them know.

“I forgot to put our meeting in my calendar.”
Sorry but for whereas this could be an honest mistake it may not be as
acceptable given that modern technology gives us all kinds of ways to keep
our calendars up to date.
I call this a lame and anaemic reason/excuse at the best of times.

Or you have those who enthusiastically agree to volunteer to help out but
then here come some of the typical excuses and there is really no way to
dispute these.
The give away could be when they cop out at the last minute but then again
you need to use your intuition to evaluate.
“I have to work.”
“I have to baby sit my friend’s cat or dog.”
“I have to visit a family member who unexpectedly ended up in hospital due
to an accident.”

Ah yes! Reasons/excuses and just my two cents for today.

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