Complaining and criticizing

My goodness! It’s November 16 and here we are already experiencing old man
winter!
However, the Santa Claus parade is tomorrow and I’ll definitely be cheering
on the jolly old fellow.
Well, another cold and refreshing November and today I am pleased to share
our president’s weekly editorial with you.
For this week, Donna J. Jodhan concentrates her attention on complaining and
criticizing.
Happy weekend everyone!
I’m Scott Savoy

+++++++++++++++

Complaining and criticizing
By Donna J. Jodhan

There is absolutely nothing wrong with complaining and criticizing but what
would probably make it all more effective is how we do it.

If we complain and criticize in an outrageous manner or if we do it in a
nasty way, chances are that 99% of the time our moaning and groaning would
fall on deaf ears. However, if we do it in a constructive way then the
chances of gaining listeners would be much higher.

As they say, it is not what we say but how we say it. It is when we say it
and the words we use to say it. It is the tone of our voices that
determines how it would be received by those around us.

If we shout and swear when we complain and criticize then you can bet your
bottom dollar that almost no one is going to pay attention. However, if we
are calm, collective, and methodical when we complain and criticize then
chances of success will increase dramatically.

If we adopt the right strategy then our complaints and criticisms will more
than likely be viewed as constructive but if we choose to take the noisy
approach then complaints and criticisms will be exactly what they are;
nothing but complaints and criticisms!

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific day and weekend.

To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca.

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Attitude adjustments

Greetings everyone and ah yes! Take a deep breath now and let’s welcome in
the holiday season. A bit premature you might be thinking but not really!
Today I am pleased to share our president’s weekly editorial with you and
for this week Donna J. Jodhan hones in on attitude adjustments.
Happy weekend everyone!
I’m Christian Robicheau
And let us not forget to remember on Nov 11!
We must never forget!

+++++++++++++++

Attitude adjustments
By Donna J. Jodhan

I am not sure if I could come up with a better way to describe how I feel
today. It is all about attitude adjustments and here are my thoughts.

Entitlement –
I truly believe that we need to take a long hard look at how we feel about
this. In my humble opinion, I do not think that for the most part we should
adopt such an attitude and why? Because more often than not it makes us
lazy, and we are unable to get rid of the haziness.

True it is that we are entitled to our rights under our constitution and our
charter; and that we are entitled to such things as good health care,
education, equal opportunities to employment and social programs, and equal
access to websites but we are not entitled to much more. We are also
entitled to good customer service and the do onto others as you would have
them do onto you!

We are not entitled to such things as inheritances or to expect our parents
to look after us in adulthood. We are not entitled to have them provide us
with food, shelter, and amenities in our adulthood.

Attitude adjustments –
I think that we need to readjust our attitudes to such things as:
Commitment, dedication, respect, courtesy, professionalism, kindness,
generosity, and I will end here for now.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

LSAT will change for all would-be lawyers as a result of blind man’s lawsuit settlement

LSAT will change for all would-be lawyers as a result of blind man’s lawsuit
settlement
“I’ve never had to answer a question like that in any state or federal
court,”
BY DEBRA CASSENS WEISS
OCTOBER 9, 2019, 2:11 PM CDT
The current analytical reasoning section of the Law School Admission Test
will eventually be dropped as a result of a settlement in a lawsuit by a
legally blind man who said he was unable to draw diagrams
to help him answer the questions.
Corrected: But analytical reasoning—also referred to as logic games—will
still be assessed on the test, according to a press release announcing the
settlement. Over the next four years, the Law School
Admission Council will develop different ways of testing analytical
reasoning.
The LSAC will also work with lawsuit plaintiffs Angelo Binno and Shelesha
Taylor to identify additional accommodations that they can use if they take
the test in the future.
The changes are part of a broader review of how to test for fundamental
skills for success in law schools in ways that can improve access for all
test takers.
The LSAC sent an email to law schools on Tuesday saying it is too early to
speculate on how the test will evolve, Law.com reports. Any significant
changes to format will require extensive research, testing
and analysis, the email said. In the meantime, the LSAT will continue to
test analytical reasoning.
Binno had filed his lawsuit against the LSAC in May 2017 after his prior
suit against the ABA was tossed. Taylor had moved to intervene as a
plaintiff after the second suit was filed.
Binno, who lives in metropolitan Detroit, had alleged violations of the
Americans with Disabilities Act and the Michigan Persons with Disabilities
Civil Rights Act. Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel
described the settlement in a press release as “a major victory for the
blind and visually impaired
communities.”
Binno and Taylor were represented by the Nyman Turkish law firm.
Lawyer Jason Turkish told Above the Law that he hopes the test won’t look
anything like the current version. He gave this example of a reasoning
question that he considers irrelevant to law practice: A, B,
C, D and E go into a bar and E is next to A and A is next to B and C must be
two spaces over from E. Where is D?
“I’ve never had to answer a question like
that in any state or federal court,” Turkish said, “but that’s how we’re
deciding who’s going to go to law school.”
Source:
http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/lsat-will-change-for-all-would-be-lawyers-as-a-result-of-blind-mans-lawsuit-settlement?
fbclid=IwAR05oVxG0ei8WkeADJqcgLu_2WYzhBg5QJWLi5ZlcvTxWb1bgikOqKB_g0E

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The power of our community

Well! I simply cannot believe that November is here and guess what? The
holiday season is just around the corner and I cannot wait to start
celebrating!
Today, I am pleased to share our president’s weekly editorial with you and
for this week Donna J. Jodhan focuses her attention on the power of the
special needs community.
Happy weekend everyone!
I’m Scott Savoy

+++++++++++++++

The power of our community
By Donna J. Jodhan

For less we forget; I am here to beat a steady drum when it comes to
promoting the power of our community. There are those who honestly feel
that the special needs community probably does not have the power to help
make differences. I say a loud no to this sentiment.

We have shown time and again that through powerful petitioning, professional
behaviour, constructive criticism, and all round level headedness, we can
make a difference.

Our latest display of community power came when we convinced the government
of the day that there needed to be an accessible Canada Act and thanks to
our community it is now legislation.

What I believe that we need to do is to keep on this track. We need to
build our strength in numbers. We need to collaborate more, think more
outside the box, and to keep on hammering to the rest of Canada that
disability does not discriminate when it comes to taking victims! In short,
disability knows no bounds. It does not care which age group it attacks.
It does not differentiate between gender, race, or ethnicity.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Canadian Transportation Agency Announces Plans to Enhance Accessibility of Canada’s National Transportation System

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Canadian Transportation Agency Announces Plans to Enhance Accessibility of
Canada’s National Transportation System

PR NewswireJune 21, 2019

GATINEAU, QC, June 21, 2019 /CNW/ – Bill C-81, the Accessible Canada Act ,
which received Royal Assent
today, will provide the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) with new tools
to help advance the
accessibility of the national transportation system.

Once in force, this legislation will provide the CTA with:

.own motion powers to initiate investigations, upon approval of the Minister
of Transport, regardless of
whether a formal complaint has been made;

.new power to award compensation for lost wages, pain and suffering, and
willful or reckless practice
when an adjudication finds that there was an undue barrier to the mobility
of persons with disabilities.
This power to award compensation aligns with that of the Canadian Human
Rights Tribunal;

.Enforcement tools such as increase of inspection powers, compliance
agreements and warnings;

.the ability for a designated enforcement officer to levy Administrative
Monetary Penalties up to a
maximum of $250,000 for non-compliance with certain accessibility related
requirements;

.the ability for the CTA to determine that, even if industry complies with
regulations, there is still an
undue barrier to a person’s mobility, and order corrective measures; and

.a new mandate to make regulations on planning and reporting obligations for
industry.

As the CTA prepares to implement this legislation, it is working closely
with other organizations
responsible for receiving accessibility-related complaints the Canadian
Human Rights Commission, the
Canadian Human Rights Tribunal, the Canadian Radio-television and
Telecommunications Commission,
and the Federal Public Service Labour Relations and Employment Board to
provide a “no wrong door”
experience for persons with disabilities who want to submit complaints.

In parallel to this legislation, the CTA is developing new Accessible
Transportation for Persons with
Disabilities Regulations. The final regulations, expected to be published in
Part II of the Canada Gazette
by summer 2019, will mark a major step forward for travellers with
disabilities. The CTA will administer
and enforce the new regulations in part by using the new authorities
provided by the Accessible Canada
Act.

In addition, the CTA will develop additional regulations by summer 2022 to
cover the planning and
reporting obligations of transportation service providers, as well as
accessibility requirements for small
carriers.

In support of protecting the fundamental right of persons with disabilities
to accessible transportation
services, the CTA’s existing dispute resolution services will continue to
serve Canadians as a mechanism
to resolve accessibility complaints via facilitation, mediation, or
adjudication.

Quote

“Accessible transportation is a human right whose realization is essential
to achieving equality, inclusion,
and dignity for Canadians with disabilities. The legislation provides the
CTA with new tools to advance
the accessibility of the national transportation system to help achieve our
vision to make the national
transportation system the most accessible in the world.

Scott Streiner, Chair and CEO of the Canadian Transportation Agency

About the CTA

The Canadian Transportation Agency is an independent, quasi-judicial
tribunal and regulator that has,
with respect to all matters necessary for the exercise of its jurisdiction,
all the powers of a superior
court. The CTA has three core mandates: helping to keep the national
transportation system running
efficiently and smoothly, protecting the fundamental right of persons with
disabilities to accessible
transportation services, and providing consumer protection for air
passengers. To help advance these
mandates, the CTA makes and enforces ground rules that establish the rights
and responsibilities of
transportation service providers and users and level the playing field among
competitors, resolves
disputes using a range of tools from facilitation and mediation to
arbitration and adjudication, and
ensures that transportation providers and users are aware of their rights
and responsibilities and how
the CTA can help them.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/canadian-transportation-agency-announces-plans-enhance-accessibility-canadas-195100468.html

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The blind lead the blind at the Pacific Training Centre

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

The blind lead the blind at the Pacific Training Centre

Centre specializes in teaching visually impaired people everyday skills to
live an independent life
Kendra Crighton, Mar. 23, 2019.
Local News

It’s the blind leading the blind at the Pacific Training Centre in
Victoria and they wouldn’t have it any other way.

The training centre, run out of the Victoria Disability Resource Centre,
specializes in teaching people who either are completely blind or in the
process
of losing their vision everyday skills that enable them to live an
independent life.

Skills such as reading braille, travelling with a long white cane – indoors
and outdoors – and using voice controlled laptops and smart phones along
with
cooking and general life skills are taught by teachers who are blind
themselves, offering a better understanding of what life is like without
sight.

RELATED: Victoria installation for the blind causes problems for those with
mobility issues

Elizabeth Lalonde, executive director of the centre, was born without her
sight. As the only blind child in her school, Lalonde was integrated with
the rest of
her classmates leaving her with little specialized training.

“So I didn’t learn braille as a young child,” says Lalonde. “And just like
any language, the younger you learn the better because you can absorb it.”

Reading print was also possible for her so long as the letters were massive
when Lalonde was young, but as her vision digressed she had to switch to
cassette
tape audio books to help her get through school and eventually university.

“I don’t know if I started out an audio learner, but I certainly became
one,” she laughs.

RELATED: Victoria woman tired of having to prove she is blind

It wasn’t until Lalonde got the chance to attend the Louisiana Centre for
the Blind, a residential training facility that focuses on self-sufficiency
and
independence, that she realized her dream was to take the teachings and
bring them to the Canada.

Spending nine months at the centre, learning blind skills with 30 other
blind adults, Lalonde says the experience changed her life completely.

“It’s quite profound the changes in real life,” she says. “They really
challenged what I thought I was capable of.”

Josh Yates, a student and employee of the centre, was born with a
degenerative condition leaving him with severe tunnel vision.

“It’s like looking through a toilet paper roll,” says Yates. “Of the 180
degrees of peripheral vision that most people have, I’ve got about 5 – so if
I look at
your nose now, I can’t see your chin.”

Yates is currently learning braille which allows him to read in the dark,
something he can’t do right now, along with cane travelling skills making
things
‘a lot easier and safer’ for independent travel.

“In my personal opinion, a bad attitude is the biggest disability you can
have,” says Yates. “There are a lot of people who say ‘oh, it sucks that you
are losing
your vision,’ but no it really doesn’t – [people] make it a bigger deal than
I do.”

Yates says while there are things he’s wanted to do and now knows he can’t,
he doesn’t let that take away from living his life to the fullest.

“Things like parkour – I like to do the crazy stuff – and parkour is not a
good idea for me,” says Yates very matter-of-fact. “But that doesn’t stop me
from
doing other things that I enjoy and still do.”

Will Arnold lost his vision in a 2011 accident. He says life felt like it
was at a standstill and was really boring before he found the centre.

RELATED: City of Victoria responds to blind community’s B.C. Human Rights
Tribunal case

“After coming to the centre, it took a while for things to get going but it
was definitely a noticeable improvement on the first day,” says Arnold.
“Everything
just started happening, not directly connected to the centre – the timing
was right I guess.”

One of the requirement to graduate the program is cooking a meal for eight
people all by themselves. a task that encompasses all the skills taught at
the
centre and highlighting the students independence.

“We have a freedom bell [at the graduation ceremony], we give everyone a
little bell and they ring it and it signifies that you’re free now and you
can what you
want,” says Lalonde.

kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

C 2019, Victoria News and Black Press Group Ltd.

https://www.vicnews.com/news/the-blind-lead-the-blind-at-the-pacific-training-centre/

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

How functional are special needs departments?

Greetings and I’m Christian Robicheau hoping that all is well in your neck
of the woods.
It is the final weekend of October and I cannot believe that it is.
Today, I am delighted to share our president’s weekly editorial with you and
for this week Donna J. Jodhan talks about those very important special needs
departments at companies.
Happy weekend everyone.

+++++++++++++++

Special needs departments
By Donna J. Jodhan

Now that the Accessible Canada Act has been brought into legislation; we
should expect to see that several federally governed organizations and
companies will be seeking to either improve and/or enhance the services that
their special needs departments offer or they will be scrambling to
initialize said types of departments.

We can say the same for federal departments in that they too will be
frantically scrambling to ensure that they are able to offer more than
adequate services to special needs Canadians.

All well and good and I for one look forward to improvements in these types
of services but I’d like to offer these respectful words of wisdom.

* Make sure that your staff is well trained in the rudiments of how to
communicate with and understand the requests and requirements of special
needs Canadians.

* Make sure to really train your staff that “one size does not fit all.”
Meaning that for example; the requirements of a vision impaired person is
not the same for every vision impaired person.

* Some quality time needs to be spent instructing your staff on the topic of
alternate formats, the requirements for making said documents accessible,
how to make them accessible, and why they are needed.

* Staff need to receive training on how to help callers whenever they
require assistance with websites that are not accessible, usable, or
navigable.

* Staff need to receive some education on some of the more popular types of
access technology being used by Canadians with special needs.

* Technical staff need to be trained as to how to communicate with persons
with special needs.

I can go on and on but these are my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

CBC coverage of Hodge case

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

CBC coverage of Hodge case
“I had to crawl’: Amputee seeks damages after United Airlines and airport
security seize scooter batteries

A B.C. man says airline officials and airport security agents were violating
the law when they seized the lithium batteries he needed to operate a
portable scooter. Now he’s fighting to take his case to the Canadian Human
Rights Commission.

Erica Johnson

CBC News, Apr. 28, 2019

Stearn Hodge says he’s ‘had enough’ of airport security agents and airlines
trying to take away the batteries for his portable scooter – a disability
violation. He’s fighting to take United Airlines, WestJet and the Canadian
Air Transport Security Authority to the Canadian Human Rights Commission.
(Gary Moore/CBC)

Stearn Hodge says he will never forget the humiliation of having to drag his
body across a hotel room floor during what was supposed to be a vacation
celebrating his 43rd wedding anniversary – because a security agent at the
Calgary International Airport and United Airlines confiscated the batteries
he needed to operate a portable scooter.

“Having to crawl across the floor in front of my wife is the most
humiliating thing that I can think of,” said Hodge. “It unmasks how real my
disability is . I haven’t been the same since.”

The 68-year-old retired contractor from Kelowna, B.C., lost his left arm and
right leg in a 1984 workplace accident. He now relies on a portable scooter
powered by lithium batteries.

But on a trip to Tulsa, Okla., on Feb. 26, 2017, an agent with the Canadian
Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) and a United Airlines official told
Hodge to remove the $2,000 battery from his scooter and fly without it, as
well as his spare battery.

In making the demand, both employees cited safety concerns.

Lithium-ion batteries are a potential fire hazard, but
global standards issued by the International Air
Transport Association (IATA) allow people with disabilities to travel with
compact lithium batteries for medical devices in carry-on luggage.

Hodge said no one from CATSA or United Airlines would listen to him or read
IATA documents he had printed out, showing his batteries are permitted on
board if an airline gives prior approval. Hodge had received that
permission.

“They’re taking my legs – and not only that, my dignity,” said Hodge.

He can only wear a prosthetic leg for a short period due to discomfort and
risk of infection, he said.

A few months earlier, Hodge almost had his batteries seized on a WestJet
flight. But “seconds” before takeoff – and after he suffered a panic attack
– Hodge was granted permission to take them on board.

He has now hired a lawyer and is fighting to have his case heard before the
Canadian Human Rights Commission.

A spokesperson for an Ottawa-based disability rights organization says it’s
“frustrating” that Canada’s airline industry seems to ignore hard-won
protections for people with disabilities.

“It’s been a long fight to make sure that mobility devices – or any device
used to accommodate a person with a disability – can be carried on [a
plane],” said Terrance Green, of the Council of Canadians with Disabilities.

“When security can – even with regulations in place – seize what otherwise
should be able to go onto the aircraft, that leaves people with disabilities
very vulnerable.”

When the CATSA agent seized his batteries in Calgary, the employee suggested
it wasn’t a big deal, Hodge said.

“I still remember the CATSA agent saying, ‘Well, you could get a
wheelchair.’ How’s a one-armed guy going to run a wheelchair?” asked Hodge.
“How am I going to go down a ramp and brake with one hand? But that
shouldn’t even have to come up.”

Hodge’s wife had recently undergone cancer treatment, which affected her
spine, and she couldn’t push a wheelchair for her husband.

Hodge said he asked for an agent from United Airlines to come to the
security checkpoint, as he had called the airline earlier and was assured it
was OK to bring his battery and a spare on board.

Stearn Hodge, seen with his wife, Jan, says he has been hassled about his
batteries at the airport more than a dozen times over the past two years.

But the United Airlines employee that arrived sided with the security agent.

Consequently, a three-week trip that was supposed to be a celebration with
his wife resulted in Hodge spending much of his vacation confined to his
bed.

To perform basic personal hygiene, he was forced to drag himself across the
hotel room floor to the bathroom.

“An anniversary is supposed to be all about remembering how you fell in love
. and keeping that magic alive,” said Hodge. “And those things were denied.
I’m crawling across the floor and it is pathetic.”

United apologizes

A United Airlines spokesperson told Go Public that it couldn’t comment on
Hodge’s experience, as he wants his case heard by the Canadian Human Rights
Commission.

In an email sent to Hodge by the airline, complaint resolution official
Tatricia Orija wrote that “it appears we were in violation of federal
disability requirements,” offering both Hodge and his wife an $800 travel
certificate.

She also apologized for the “inconvenience.”

“Inconvenience is when it rains on your holiday,” said Hodge. “This was a .
life-changing moment for me and my wife.”

WestJet offers travel credit

Three months before the United incident, on Nov. 27, 2016, Hodge had also
run into battery problems while travelling to Cancun, Mexico.

In that case, a WestJet employee initially told him he could take the
batteries in a carry-on, but when he got to the security checkpoint, a CATSA
agent said the batteries had to be in checked luggage.

“According to federal airline law, that’s the worst place you want to put
them,” said Hodge. “Because if a problem develops with those batteries, they
don’t know where they are and they’re only going to find out about it when
it’s too late.”

Minutes before his departure, a WestJet employee was able to confirm that
the batteries could go on the plane.

In an email to Hodge, a WestJet customer support agent wrote: “While I
cannot change your past experience, I would like to offer you a $350 future
travel credit as a goodwill gesture.”

WestJet spokesperson Morgan Bell told Go Public he couldn’t comment on the
case since it is before the courts but that “WestJet will always err on the
side of caution and supports the due diligence of its people evaluating any
items they believe may pose a safety concern.”

CATSA also wouldn’t address questions from Go Public, citing Hodge’s
complaint.

The agency did provide Hodge with a transcript of a recorded call with
client service agent Justine Drouin, who apologizes to Hodge and says “all
of the screening officers will undergo a briefing.”

The Canadian Air Transport Security Authority, in charge of security
screening at airports across the country, told Hodge that it would update
standard operating procedures to ensure all agents are briefed on batteries
permitted on board flights.

‘It’s like playing Russian roulette’

Hodge and his wife travel at least once or twice a year and say the only
place they run into trouble with his scooter batteries is in Canada.

“I have flown through Europe, the United States and Mexico since 2015 with
these batteries and have never been detained or harassed because of them. It
is only in Canada that I have been relentlessly detained,” said Hodge.

He estimates it’s happened more than a dozen times in the past two years,
saying it now triggers severe anxiety.

“When I go through the checkpoint, I’m starting to vibrate now. I don’t know
what I’m going to get. It’s like playing Russian roulette.”

‘An assault on a person’s dignity’

Green, of the Council of Canadians with Disabilities, said while he’s
pleased there are protections in place for people with disabilities who are
travelling, those protections need to be enforced.

“This is an assault on a person’s dignity,” said Green, noting his
organization has been fighting over transportation issues for four decades.

“In 1979, the government of the day said, ‘Yes, we will make our
transportation system accessible,'” he said. “Here we are . 40 years later
and the same barriers are there in transportation for Canadians with
disabilities.”

Green, who is visually impaired, said he has had security agents question
the battery in his laptop, which allows it to “talk” when it is turned on.
He said he receives “a lot of emails and telephone calls” from people with
disabilities who have been hassled at the airport.

“It happens very, very frequently,” said Green. “You put in complaints, the
first thing that happens is the airlines deny.”

Complaints to transportation agency

Go Public asked the Canadian Transportation Agency, which regulates air,
rail and marine travel, how often people have filed disability-related
complaints over the past three years.

A spokesperson said the agency has received 583 accessibility complaints
related to air travel during that time – with fewer than one per cent
related to batteries. And those numbers have steadily increased since 2016.

The majority of complaints related to the transport of mobility aids are
from passengers who have had expensive mobility devices – scooters and
wheelchairs – damaged.

Hearing in Federal Court

Last September, the Canadian Human Rights Commission referred Hodge’s
complaint to the Canadian Transportation Agency. However, the agency has no
power to award general damages beyond out-of-pocket expenses.

On May 9, Hodge’s lawyer, John Burns, will ask a Federal Court judge to
compel the commission to hear the case.

“It’s a failure of the Canadian Human Rights Commission to grant access to
the remedy that the statute provides,” said Burns.

The Canadian Human Rights Act allows for up to $20,000 in damages for each
count of pain and suffering, and up to another $20,000 if the discrimination
is “willful or reckless.”

“It sends a very clear message to the airlines and everybody else involved,”
said Burns. “People with disabilities should be taken seriously. You don’t
take away somebody’s legs and then describe it as an inconvenience. No, this
is an injury.”

‘Human rights violations cannot go unchallenged’

Hodge is optimistic he’ll eventually have his day before the Canadian Human
Rights Commission.

It’s a pricey endeavour. In order to cover legal costs, he’s had to put up
for sale a cherished Corvette he has worked on for years. But it’s a fight
he says he has to have – not just for himself, but for so many others with
disabilities.

“The thing I would love more than the compensation,” said Hodge, “is the
[legal] decision that someone can go to and say, ‘You did it here, you can
do it for me.'”

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/amputee-claims-discrimination-after-airport-security-takes-batteries-1.5109369

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Blind Japanese sailor completes nonstop Pacific crossing

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe
With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Blind Japanese sailor completes nonstop Pacific crossing
https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2019/04/20/national/im-happiest-person-earth-blind-japanese-sailor-completes-nonstop-pacific-crossing/#.XLunjBHsbjo
“‘I’m the happiest person on earth”: Blind Japanese sailor completes
nonstop Pacific crossing
FUKUSHIMA – A blind Japanese sailor on Saturday successfully completed a
near two-month, nonstop voyage from San Diego to Fukushima Prefecture,
making him the first person to make a blind sailing across the Pacific
Ocean.
Joined by a sighted navigator, it was 52-year-old Mitsuhiro Iwamoto’s
second two-person attempt at the 14,000-kilometer journey — his first
ended when his boat hit a whale and sank.
“I didn’t give up and I made a dream come true. I’m the happiest person
on earth,” Iwamoto said.
According to the Japan Blind Sailing Association, Iwamoto is the first
person in blind sailing, in which a sailor with a visual impairment
steers a boat while a sighted navigator informs the person of the
surrounding situation, to make a nonstop voyage across the Pacific.
Iwamoto, a native of Kumamoto Prefecture currently living in San Diego,
left the western U.S. city on Feb. 24 aboard his 12-meter boat Dream
Weaver with navigator Doug Smith.
Since his first attempt, Iwamoto has taken part in triathlon races to
familiarize himself with swimming in open water and to help him overcome
the traumatic 2013 sinking of his boat in the middle of the Pacific.
He was traveling in the opposite direction on his failed attempt,
starting off Fukushima Prefecture and aiming to finish in San Diego,
with a Japanese navigator. His boat sank five days after leaving port
and the two were rescued by the Self-Defense Forces.
“We undertake this voyage not only for personal accomplishment, but to
send a message that anything is possible when people come together,”
Iwamoto wrote on his website.
Iwamoto lost his sight at the age of 16. He and Smith made the voyage to
raise money for charity and for efforts to prevent diseases that cause
blindness.
?T
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-47997727

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The volunteer’s dilemma

Okay, and happy to be with you on this typical Fall weekend!
I’m Scott Savoy and today I am delighted to share our president’s weekly
editorial with you.
For this week, Donna J. Jodhan talks about the volunteer’s dilemma.
We wish you a great weekend.

+++++++++++++++

The volunteer’s dilemma
By Donna J. Jodhan

From where I sit and as a volunteer who has been one for more than half my
life, I believe that when it comes to volunteering we need to be more
careful when we say that we are going to volunteer for something or when we
commit to doing something.

For believe it or not; when we commit or say that we are going to do
something, there are those to whom we have committed and said these words to
who will depend on us.

I know that we are all so very busy doing our best to keep our heads above
water and I also know that many of us truly want to help others. However, I
also know that when we fail to meet our commitments it really makes things
difficult for others.

The one thing that we need to pay more attention to is this; we should also
learn to appreciate our volunteers more. For their time and their work. We
need to be mindful that we should not take our volunteers for granted nor
should we expect them to always give freely of their own time.

There is a fine line between expecting our volunteers to give freely and
then taking advantage of their time and skills.

My advice for what it is worth is this! Be careful when you commit. Make
sure that you have the time to do what you commit to. Do not over commit.
Do not expect to always get something for nothing. That is, do not expect
that someone will always be in a position to provide their time and skills
for nothing. We need to appreciate each other more.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment