What makes an app accessible? – developers need to remember

Greetings everyone and I’m Christian Robicheau.
Well, another very pleasant August weekend awaits us and I for one am going
to take full advantage of it.
Today, I am pleased to share our president’s weekly editorial with you and
for this week Donna J. Jodhan zooms in on what makes an app accessible.
This editorial could be very important for app developers to read.
Have a great weekend now.

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What makes an app accessible?
By Donna J. Jodhan

On August 01 the Canadian Government announced that they had given a grant
of 2.7 million dollars to a Toronto based company to help in the development
of an app that would benefit Canadians with disabilities.

This has been hailed as An accessibility application that aims to break down
barriers facing Canadians with disabilities and has received a major boost
in funding from Ottawa.

AccessNow, an online platform that uses crowd-sourced information to show
how mobility-friendly buildings and public transit are, will receive $2.7
million in investment from the federal government. Minister Qualtrough has
announced that this investment is not only a boost for
Canadians with disabilities but also for an inclusive economy.

This could be viewed as a huge boost but there is just one important concern
here and it is this. Will blind, vision impaired, and deaf/blind persons be
able to take advantage of this forward thinking app?

This would benefit those who are technically abled to use and navigate this
app and in addition, those within these communities who will be able to
afford to have an I device in order to use this app.

We know that the digital world is here to stay but there are some cold hard
facts that we need to consider when it comes to whether blind, vision
impaired, and deaf/blind persons are able to benefit and if for some reason
they are not fully able to benefit then with all due respect this app along
with so many others may not be viewed as inclusive.

Here are some of the major cold hard facts as I see it.
Can this app be used by said communities? That is, will they be able to use
and navigate with this app independently?
Will the developers be employing human testers who are blind, vision
impaired, and deaf/blind in order to ensure that said communities are able
to independently use this app?
Will be there some way for those who are unable to afford to purchase an I
device to have access to said app to be able to do so?
Will there be any training and support available to help said communities to
gain access to said app?

These cold hard facts apply to any developer of apps and we can only hope
that someone is listening and that they will take note and encourage the
influencers to take note.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

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Involve disabled people in policy-making, new global accessibility index urges

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

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Involve disabled people in policy-making, new global accessibility index
urges
Less than one quarter of countries in a large-scale global assessment
involve persons with disabilities in digital accessibility policy-making and
monitoring, acting against the Convention on the Rights of
Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), a new report claims.
Developed by G3ict – the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs – the Digital
Accessibility Rights Evaluation (DARE) Index measured the progress and
implementation of digital accessibility for persons with
disabilities in 121 countries, based on criteria set out in the CRPD. G3ict
notes that the DARE Index “builds on eight years of data collection and
analysis experience” from previous accessibility progress
reports.
Despite “positive advances” in legislation supporting ICT accessibility, the
results showed “significant gaps” when it came to actually implementing such
policies, resulting in what DARE describes as
“significant shortcomings in making digital products and services accessible
to persons with disabilities.”
The index also features a table of the top ten countries in terms of overall
performance. Oman scored highest, followed by Brazil, France, South Africa,
Qatar, United States, Italy, Russian Federation, UK,
Kenya and Spain. Grouped into wider regions, North America and Europe scored
significantly higher than other areas.
A report based on the data cites lack of involvement of persons with
disabilities in policy-making as the most pressing issue holding back
digital accessibility, but other issues are also highlighted.
These include lack of involvement with international standards (such as
WCAG, the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines) and lack of ICT
accessibility courses offered at “major universities”, which were
available in only 37% of countries. The report claims that students in the
remaining countries “continue to graduate in computer sciences or any other
related discipline without having ever heard of ICT
accessibility.”
Good practice and positive outcomes are also highlighted in the DARE Index.
This includes a substantial increase in legislation protecting the rights of
persons with disabilities, recorded in 84% of the
countries, compared to a minority before 2006. The report claims that this
“remarkable progress” shows the impact of the CRPD.
However, the big picture outlined in the DARE Index is that many countries
are still lacking when it comes to implementing digital accessibility
measures. An overview statement on the DARE website notes
the following:
“Success stories from most advanced countries suggest that closing gaps
requires more than governments’ advocacy and resources. It requires a
long-term partnership between the public sector, industry,
DPOs and NGOs. The participation and continuous involvement of persons with
disabilities in policy-making, development and monitoring processes is vital
to build a fully accessible information society
that ensures the right to communicate and the use of knowledge for all.”
Read more about the DARE Index at the
G3ict website
http://g3ict.org/

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Technology’s unavoidable glitch – a perspective from Donna Jodhan

Happy August to everyone and I’m Scott Savoy back from a nice long rest.
No ringing phones and endless emails to respond to.
Now it’s back to the grind and today I am delighted to share our president’s
weekly editorial with you.
For this week, Donna J. Jodhan focuses on technology’s unavoidable glitch.
It’s a great perspective and I encourage you to read on.
Happy weekend everyone.

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Technology’s unavoidable glitch

Say what you may, when it comes to technology there is one very blatant and
glaring glitch that is so very well known. Sure, we can use battery power to
keep our laptop computers and I devices going whenever electricity deserts
but whenever cable or the Internet goes down; then there goes technology.

This is a glitch that is very unfixable and whenever it happens, I am always
tempted to smile a bit because I can find ways to get around it.

Yes! As a vision impaired person it is probably easier for me to find work
arounds whenever cable or the Internet go down. I have Braille to back me
up. No! Braille is not a technological substitute for cable and wi-fi
outages. I like to refer to Braille as something that I can use to keep me
going at times like these.

As long as my documents have been stored in Braille format, then I can
easily access it with a Braille device but first I need to ensure that my
device is fully charged. So here is the picture in a nutshell.

If electricity goes, and if I have battery power, I can use my Braille
device to keep me going.
If Cable and Internet are both down then my trusty Braille device is there
for me electricity or no electricity.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

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Gaming industry told that “tiny tweaks” equal huge acces

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Gaming industry told that “tiny tweaks” equal huge accessibility boosts
Video game developers have been asked to make their products more inclusive
for players with disabilities by sector experts at an event in London.
In a session on ‘Accessible games’ at TechShare Pro 2018 (a wide-ranging
digital accessibility conference), three speakers explained to delegates why
accessibility is so important in this area and
explained what changes need to be made.
Games journalist Mark Brown – whose ‘Game Maker’s Toolkit’ YouTube channel
has over half a million subscribers – started his presentation by stating
that “video games are a particularly difficult topic for
accessibility, because they touch on basically every category of
disability.”
He then worked through a checklist of ten points for developers to consider
when creating new video games. These included: controller sensitivity, clear
subtitles, volume controls for separate elements,
visual contrast, difficulty customisation and simulation sickness (similar
to motion sickness, causing some players to feel nauseous – often in 3D or
first-person perspective games). He also gave examples
of good practice, highlighting games where visually impaired players can
turn off background visuals (‘Street Fighter IV’) and choose their own
colour palette (‘For Honor’) to assist with visual contrast and
colour blindness issues.
Following on was Mark Friend, a senior user researcher and accessibility
specialist for Sony Interactive Entertainment, the company behind the
PlayStation brand. Friend discussed his visits to numerous
game studios to explain to development teams what steps could be taken to
improve the accessibility of their games at the beginning of the process,
flagging up common “unintentional barriers” that are
often created.
An accessibility consultant and blind gamer known as Sightless Kombat was
the final speaker in the session, discussing audio gaming and different
approaches used by players with sight loss for various
game genres. “It’s important for sighted gamers to engage with audio gaming
experiences, because they are so integral to culture and social
interaction,” he said.
He then highlighted the importance of the 21st Century Communications and
Video Accessibility Act (CVAA), a piece of legislation from the United
States which will require game developers to make
communication interfaces and navigation elements in their games accessible
for users with disabilities. The Act comes into force in the US on January
1, 2019, and is expected to have a significant impact
on game development in the country.
Sightless Kombat pointed out the increasing popularity of accessibility
functions with a wider audience, noting that “although these features were
initially targeted at those with disabilities, they’ve expanded
[to a larger audience] due to convenience.” He ended with a final request to
game developers: “Tiny tweaks can make such a big difference, even small
things – like audio cues – which may not be noticed
by most people.”
Read more about visually impaired gaming at the
Sightless Kombat website
http://www.sightlesskombat.com/

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The gadget syndrome – a growing concern or not?

Greetings everyone! I’m Christian Robicheau welcoming you to the month of
August.
Just got back from a nice fun vacation and guess what? We have a holiday in
our neck of the woods
Several Provinces in Canada are enjoying a holiday weekend!
This Week, I am delighted to share our president’s weekly editorial with you
and for today Donna J. Jodhan zooms in on the gadget syndrome!
Enjoy your weekend now.

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The gadget syndrome
By Donna J. Jodhan

Like it or not; this seems to be the order of the day. For so many of us,
it appears that in order to live our daily lives we need to have a gadget
either in the palms of our hands, on our night tables, or even under our
pillows.

We do not seem to be able to function if we cannot have a gadget in our
purse or pocket and if we need to do some thing as simple as check the date
or perform a calculation, then woe be onto us if we cannot find our I device
or calculator to do it. Even more humorous are those who need to consult
their I device in order to retrieve their home address or home phone number.

In short, if we do not have our gadget at our finger tips then we are lost!
What ever happened to depending on our good old memory whenever we needed to
remember or recall an important piece of information? Whatever happened to
being able to call on our mental arithmetic to perform simple calculations?
Or even more; whatever happened to our ability to perform simple logic
processes?

I would respectfully submit that this landscape has shifted from being able
to depend on a strong mental process to the dependence on the gadget
syndrome.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A cure for blindness

Is this the break through that blind and vision impaired persons could be
waiting and hoping for?
A cure for blindness

By Ben Spencer

Daily Mail, Jul 12, 2019

A cure for blindness: Father, 35, who suddenly lost his sight aged nine is
among six patients to have their
vision restored by pioneering treatment that beams images directly into the
brain

Doctors have restored sight to the blind by sending video images directly to
the brain.

In a world-first that offers hope to millions of patients, five men and one
woman have regained vision
after years of ‘living in the dark’.

They had electrode chips planted in the visual cortex at the back of their
skulls that picked up images
from a tiny video camera mounted in a pair of glasses. Their eyes were
bypassed completely.

One of the participants, Benjamin James Spencer, who went blind aged nine,
described his joy at seeing
his wife and three daughters for the first time.
‘It is awe inspiring to see so much beauty,’ the 35-year-old told the Daily
Mail last night. ‘I could see the
roundness of my wife’s face, the shape of her body.

‘I could see my kids running up to give me a hug. It is not perfect vision –
it is like grainy 1980s
surveillance video footage. It may not be full vision yet, but it’s
something.’

Mr Spencer described how, when he was nine years old, his world went black.

‘It was September 18, 1992, a week after my birthday,’ he said. ‘I was at
school leaving a class and in the
time it took me to walk 50ft everything disappeared.

‘At first it started to go foggy and then a few paces later it was just
dark.

‘I panicked and started screaming and kind of went into shock. Everything
after that is pretty vague.’

In the coming days specialists at a hospital near his home in Texas broke
the news that he would never
see again.

‘I was told this was going to be my future. I was classed as lacking 100 per
cent light perception. I was
blind,’ he said.

Mr Spencer had paediatric glaucoma, a rare condition caused by a defect in
the eye’s drainage system.

It had been incurable but scientists have now managed to bypass the broken
link by sending images
directly to the visual cortex, the part of the brain responsible for sight.

Mr Spencer lives in the city of Pearland, near Houston, with his wife
Jeanette, 42, and daughters Abigail,
15, Melissa, 13, and Jane, ten. In April 2018, he became one of just six
people to have a 60-electrode
panel implanted in the back of his brain.

Surgeons at Baylor Medical College in Houston spent two hours cutting a
window in his skull, placing the
electrode array on the surface of the brain, and stitching it up again. They
then spent six months
‘mapping’ his visual field.

This involved sending computer signals to the stimulation panel in his head
to synchronise his brain to
the real world – in effect teaching his visual cortex to process images
again.

Eventually, in October, the device was wirelessly connected to a tiny video
camera, mounted in a pair of
glasses, and switched on. He saw his wife and three children for the very
first time.

‘It was an incredible moment,’ he told the Daily Mail. ‘It was very
humbling.’

Describing catching a glimpse of the sun through the window, he said: ‘Such
a tiny thing is normal for
people who have vision. But I had not seen the sun since I was nine years
old. I had felt its heat, but
actually seeing it was incredible. After 25 and a half years of living in
the dark, it is awe inspiring to see
so much beauty.’

In January, after months of hospital testing, he was allowed to take the
device home. The terms of the
clinical trial means he can only switch it on for three hours a day, but he
makes the most of it. ‘I usually
use it for 45 minutes at a time and space it out,’ he said. ‘If I want to go
to the store or if one of my kids
has a performance.

‘It is not perfect vision – it is like grainy 1980s surveillance video
footage,’ he said.

‘I can see silhouettes, I can see light and shade, I can guess at colours.
It may not be full vision yet, but it’s something.

‘I can go to the store, I can walk without my cane, I can sort my dark
laundry from the whites, I can see a
crack in the sidewalk coming up. I could see a sign sticking out – but I
couldn’t read what it said.’

Even when completely blind, Mr Spencer learnt to thrive independently.

He finished school, went to college and earned a masters in business,
focusing on international trade. He
worked for a few years in import-export and then set up his own tax
business.

‘I was determined to be an independent person,’ he said. ‘There is always a
way around whatever the
world throws at you.

‘Luckily I had people around me who said you can allow this to define you,
or you can define life. But
that being said, everything was a stepping stone. I learned that life was
about adaptation.’

British experts described the breakthrough in the United States as a
‘paradigm shift’ in the treatment of
the blind.

Patients who have benefited from the Orion wireless technology include those
who have lost their sight
due to glaucoma, trauma, infections, autoimmune diseases and nerve problems.

But the surgeons – from Baylor Medical College in Texas and the University
of California Los Angeles –
believe they can eventually help anyone who has lost their sight. They are
unsure, however, whether it
could help people born blind – because the visual cortex would never have
learnt to process images.

They plan to implant 30 more devices over the next few months and if the
results continue to be
positive expect the technology to become widely available within three
years.

Alex Shortt, a University College London lecturer and surgeon at Optegra Eye
Hospital in the capital,
said: ‘This, to my mind, is a massive breakthrough, an amazing advance and
it is very exciting.

‘Previously all attempts to create a “bionic eye” focused on implanting into
the eye itself. It required you
to have a working eye, a working optic nerve.

‘By bypassing the eye completely you open the potential up to many, many
more people.

‘This is a complete paradigm shift for treating people with complete
blindness. It is a real message of
hope.’

He said the quality of the images would only improve.

Second Sight, the small American firm which makes the device, already has
links in the UK thanks to
another visual gadget trialled by the NHS. It plans to try to make Orion
available here as soon as it is fully
approved in the US.

Two million Britons have sight loss – 360,000 of whom are registered as
blind. These figures are set to
double by 2050.

Another patient in the trial was able to tell apart the different balls on a
pool table, picking out the cue
ball from the striped balls and even picking out the blue ball. Others can
walk around a block unaided,
avoiding cars and pedestrians, and tell the curb from the road.

Scientists hope to radically improve the quality of the device.

The current prototype has 60 electrodes. The version they hope to use in
their next trial will have 150 –
and in time this will go up.

Daniel Yoshor, the neurosurgeon at Baylor who implanted the device in Mr
Spencer’s brain, said: ‘When
you think of vision, you think of the eyes, but most of the work is being
done in the brain. The impulses
of light that are projected onto the retina are converted into neural
signals that are transmitted along
the optic nerve to parts of the brain.’

The Orion device works by replicating that process with a video camera. The
electrodes stimulate spots
in the visual field – the ‘mind’s eye’ – which when working together create
a black and white image that
replicates the real world. Professor Yoshor said: ‘If you imagine every spot
in the visual field, the visual
world, there’s a corresponding part of the brain that represents that area,
that spatial location.

‘If we stimulate someone’s brain in a specific spot we will produce a
perception of a spot of light
corresponding to that map in the visual world.

‘The idea is if we cleverly stimulate the individual spots in the brain with
electrodes we can actually
reproduce visual form, like pixels on an LCD screen.’

He added: ‘I tell these patients they’re like astronauts flying to the Moon,
they’re taking bold steps to
see not only if the device can help them as individuals, but if it can help
the community of blind patients
across the world.’

The results from the first six patients, presented at the World Society for
Stereotactic and Functional
Neurosurgery conference in New York a fortnight ago, revealed each patient
had regained at least some
degree of vision.

Second Sight is in negotiations with the FDA, the US health regulator, to
launch another study in the
coming months involving 30 patients.

Will McGuire, head of the firm, said: ‘We expect at least two to three years
until it is going to be
available commercially. That will be down to negotiations with the FDA. Then
we will start discussions
with regulatory bodies outside the US.’

The Orion system is built on the success of an earlier device called the
Argus II, which uses a similar
camera to send images to an implant at the back of the eye, restoring sight
to people who have started
to lose their vision to common conditions such as age-related macular
degeneration – or AMD.

It hit the headlines when it was unveiled at Manchester Royal Eye Hospital
five years ago.

But it relied on a patient having at least some working retinal cells,
stimulating them with the video
images and sending the signal through the optic nerve to the brain.

The new system takes the concept a step further – bypassing the eye
completely and sending the images
directly to the brain.

This means anyone could benefit, even if their eyes are irreversibly damaged
or missing altogether –
such as those who have lost an eye in an accident or on the battlefield, or
those who have become
blinded by cancer, meningitis or sepsis.

Helen Lee, of the Royal National Institute of Blind People, said: ‘We
welcome this innovative technology
which appears to have the potential to improve visual experience for

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Be careful when you bring out your cheque books

Greetings and I’m Scott Savoy and I have to admit that July is probably one
of my favourite months and why?
Because it is holiday time for us and I hope that wherever you are; it is
the same for you.
Today, I am pleased to share our president’s weekly editorial with you and
for this week Donna J. Jodhan warns against being careful when you bring out
your cheque books.
I wish you a great weekend.

+++++++++++++++

Be careful when you bring out your cheque books
By Donna J. Jodhan

This editorial is meant to be a friendly message for any company that
believes that offering financial compensation to complainants will help to
solve a problem and make both it and the complainant go away.

Over the years, this has been the preferred solution for so many companies.
They have chosen this method rather than working with complainants to find
meaningful solutions.

They have deliberately chosen to spend countless dollars in first attempting
to drag out complaints and when this does not work they then try to put a
lid on things by bringing out their cheque books and offering money in
return for complainants agreeing to stay silent in return.

What does not make sense is this! A complainant has a very legitimate
complaint. They seek remedies at the appropriate provincial or federal
agency. Respondents have a chance to collaborate with complainants to fix
said complaint and develop solutions. However, they choose a path of
spending oodles of money on hiring lawyers who use bullying tactics to try
and wear down complainants.

Meanwhile, the money that they have spent on their high priced lawyers could
easily have been spent on fixing the problem.

This trend continues but more complainants are slowly becoming better at
fighting these tactics and it is hoped that with time that companies will
start to change their strategy.

More complainants are becoming better when it comes to determination, grit,
and a willingness to stand up, speak up, and speak out and I can only urge
anyone who believes that they have a real or legitimate complaint to do just
that.

True it is that there will always be circumstances where a complainant would
find it easier to accept money rather than to be subjected to dirty tactics
but at the end of the day money can never buy a better future for us. That
is, money should never be allowed to buy our silence.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Canadian airlines ask appeal court to quash new passenger rights rules

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

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From the business desk team
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+++++++++++++++

Canadian airlines ask appeal court to quash new passenger rights rules
Passengers
Passengers wait to check-in at Trudeau Airport on July 19, 2017 in Montreal.
THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

The Canadian Press, Friday, July 5, 2019.

MONTREAL — Canadian airlines are among hundreds of carriers asking the
Federal Court of Appeal to
quash new rules that beef up compensation for passengers subjected to
delayed flights and damaged
luggage.
Air Canada and Porter Airlines Inc., along with 17 other applicants that
include the International Air
Transport Association — which has some 290 member airlines — state in a
court filing that required
payments under the country’s new air passenger bill of rights violate
international standards and should
be rendered invalid.

The court application argues the new provisions contravene the Montreal
Convention, a multilateral
treaty, in part by setting compensation amounts based on the length of the
delay and “irrespective of
the actual damage suffered.”

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Photos
A silhouette of an airplane
A silhouette of an airplane flying overhead. (AP)

The application, filed last Friday, also says nullifying the regulations
“would avoid the confusion to
passengers” who could be subject to travel regimes from multiple
jurisdictions on international flights.

Starting July 15, passengers will have to be compensated up to $2,400 if
they are denied boarding
because a flight was overbooked and receive up to
$2,100 for lost or damaged luggage. Compensation of up to $1,000 for delays
and other payments for
cancelled flights will take effect in December.

The issue came to the forefront after a 2017 incident in which two
Montreal-bound Air Transat jets were
diverted to Ottawa due to bad weather and held on the tarmac for up to six
hours, leading some
passengers to call
911 for rescue.

John McKenna, who heads the Air Transport Association of Canada, called the
compensation grid “very
high” and the new rules “outrageous.”

“They’re trying to meet international standards and do better, and I don’t
see why. We’ve been
complaining about that from the start, that this is going to drive up the
price of flying in Canada,” he said
from Portugal.

Passenger rights advocates say the rules do not go far enough, arguing the
criteria for monetary
compensation are tough to meet as passengers would have to present evidence
that is typically in the
hands of an airline.

Gabor Lukacs, founder of the group Air Passenger Rights, has said the
regulations give airlines “carte
blanche to refuse” compensation based on unverifiable maintenance issues.

The rules impose no obligation on airlines to pay customers for delays or
cancellations if they were
caused by mechanical problems discovered in a pre-flight check — walking
around the aircraft before
takeoff looking for defects in the fuselage and flight control surfaces —
rather than during scheduled
maintenance — more thorough inspections required after 100 hours
cumulatively in the air.

AirHelp, a Berlin-based passenger-rights company, has said the number of
issues categorized as outside
an airline’s control amounts to a long list of ways to avoid compensating
passengers.

The court application, which Air Canada said was initiated by the
International Air Transport Association
(IATA), argues the new compensation rules “breach Canada’s international
obligations and exceed the
regulation-making authority” of the Canadian Transportation Agency.

“Aviation is a global industry and as such, regulations need to be
harmonized and follow the Montreal
Convention,” IATA spokeswoman Mona Aubin said in an email.

Lukacs challenged that assertion, saying it “was already hashed out in the
European Court of Justice and
was rejected.”

“IATA does not understand that in Canada, international treaties have force
only to the extent that they
are incorporated in law,” he said.

Lukacs also shot down the notion that overlapping regulatory regimes would
sew confusion. “If you fly,
say, KLM from Toronto to Amsterdam, then both can apply and you can just
pick and choose.”

The application for judicial review also argues the distinction between
large and small carriers — defined
by annual passenger numbers and bearing on compensation amount owed —
amounts to “differential
treatment…without any statutory authorization for such discrimination.”

The Canadian Transportation Agency said it will respond with a court filing
by July 8, but declined to
comment on the case.

Companies in this story: (TSX:AC)

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Far from being a sleepy Canada

Greetings and I’m Christian Robicheau and I hope that wherever you are your
weekend is going to be a fantastic one for you.
Today I am delighted to share our president’s weekly editorial with you and
for this week Donna J. Jodhan raises her glass to her homeland of Canada.
Happy weekend!

+++++++++++++++

Far from being a sleepy Canada

For those who still believe that this tiny corner of the globe that we
lovingly call Canada is but a sleepy and boring country that sits just north
of the United States, then you need to think again.

We are very much alive! We know how to celebrate! We know how to play
fairly! We surely know how to call a spade a spade as they say! And most
important of all! We definitely know how to provide a warm and livable home
to millions of citizens of the world and to appreciate what we have!

We are often thought of as polite, considerate, apologetic, and
accommodating but let it be known that there is a lot more to Canada and
Canadians than this! Most of the world like us and welcome us and more
often than not we are considered to be fair players in the arena of politics
but there is a lot more to us than this!

Canada has so much to be proud of and this was clearly shown on Monday June
17 when hundreds of thousands of people living in Toronto came out to
celebrate the historic victory of the Raptors Basketball team! You see!
Our beloved Raptors did something unthinkable when they clinched the NBA’s
most coveted trophy! This being the National title! A very first for a
team outside of the United States and let us not forget that the game of
Basketball was invented right here in Canada! So as they say, it was time
for things to come full circle!

From moms pushing toddlers in strollers to kids playing hooky and from
thousands streaming and spilling out of subway stations to doctors and
nurses in scrubs running out of hospitals and from those coming out of
stores and restaurants to postmen dropping their mail bags on the sidewalk
to watch the Raptors team as they rode by atop their trucks! Even men and
women in suits and off duty law men were there!

They all came to say thank you and to raise their salutes! Even the
politicians were there! From Mayor of the City and even the Prime Minister!

Persons of all ages came out! From the youngest to the oldest! Men, women,
kids, young adults! Persons of all races, diversities and ethnicities!
They all came out!

And after many hours of celebrating and cheering we were all proud to say
that this was our Canada! Not just a sleepy Canada! But one that
celebrated from coast to coast! A country that not only celebrated in
Toronto but from the West Pacific Lands to the Eastern Shores of the
Maritimes!

Just my two cents for today!

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Taking responsibility for words and actions

Greetings everyone and I would like to wish all Canadians wherever you are,
a very happy Canada Day 152!
May the weather be sunny and sparkling in your neck of the woods for this
Canada Day; July 01.
Today, I am pleased to share our president’s weekly editorial with you and
for this week Donna J. Jodhan focuses on taking responsibility for actions
and words.
Enjoy your Canada Day weekend!
I’m Scott Savoy!

+++++++++++++++

Taking responsibility for words and actions
By Donna J. Jodhan

Too often, we say and do things before we take a moment to think about the
consequences of them. Then even if we do; we are often guilty of not taking
responsibility for them.

Each time we say something we need to remember that someone is listening and
each time we carry out an action someone sees what we are doing. This is
becoming more and more evident as videos and audios have become a part of
our lives.

There used to be a time when i devices were just a blip on our technological
screens but no more. They are here and they are here to stay. bystanders
do not even pause to consider each time they decide to record an incident
and this is good in the sense that it keeps the world in touch but in many
cases it could be considered as bad when someone wishes not to have
themselves recorded.

For better or for worse; whenever something is recorded it is extremely
difficult to deny it.

Maybe this new way of keeping in touch and staying in touch would some day
soon start to pay off in that we would realize that taking responsibility
for our words and actions is no longer just up to us; others will be forcing
us to do so by their recording what goes on around them.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable

informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment