Blind Japanese sailor completes nonstop Pacific crossing

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
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Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe
With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Blind Japanese sailor completes nonstop Pacific crossing
https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2019/04/20/national/im-happiest-person-earth-blind-japanese-sailor-completes-nonstop-pacific-crossing/#.XLunjBHsbjo
“‘I’m the happiest person on earth”: Blind Japanese sailor completes
nonstop Pacific crossing
FUKUSHIMA – A blind Japanese sailor on Saturday successfully completed a
near two-month, nonstop voyage from San Diego to Fukushima Prefecture,
making him the first person to make a blind sailing across the Pacific
Ocean.
Joined by a sighted navigator, it was 52-year-old Mitsuhiro Iwamoto’s
second two-person attempt at the 14,000-kilometer journey — his first
ended when his boat hit a whale and sank.
“I didn’t give up and I made a dream come true. I’m the happiest person
on earth,” Iwamoto said.
According to the Japan Blind Sailing Association, Iwamoto is the first
person in blind sailing, in which a sailor with a visual impairment
steers a boat while a sighted navigator informs the person of the
surrounding situation, to make a nonstop voyage across the Pacific.
Iwamoto, a native of Kumamoto Prefecture currently living in San Diego,
left the western U.S. city on Feb. 24 aboard his 12-meter boat Dream
Weaver with navigator Doug Smith.
Since his first attempt, Iwamoto has taken part in triathlon races to
familiarize himself with swimming in open water and to help him overcome
the traumatic 2013 sinking of his boat in the middle of the Pacific.
He was traveling in the opposite direction on his failed attempt,
starting off Fukushima Prefecture and aiming to finish in San Diego,
with a Japanese navigator. His boat sank five days after leaving port
and the two were rescued by the Self-Defense Forces.
“We undertake this voyage not only for personal accomplishment, but to
send a message that anything is possible when people come together,”
Iwamoto wrote on his website.
Iwamoto lost his sight at the age of 16. He and Smith made the voyage to
raise money for charity and for efforts to prevent diseases that cause
blindness.
?T
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-47997727

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The volunteer’s dilemma

Okay, and happy to be with you on this typical Fall weekend!
I’m Scott Savoy and today I am delighted to share our president’s weekly
editorial with you.
For this week, Donna J. Jodhan talks about the volunteer’s dilemma.
We wish you a great weekend.

+++++++++++++++

The volunteer’s dilemma
By Donna J. Jodhan

From where I sit and as a volunteer who has been one for more than half my
life, I believe that when it comes to volunteering we need to be more
careful when we say that we are going to volunteer for something or when we
commit to doing something.

For believe it or not; when we commit or say that we are going to do
something, there are those to whom we have committed and said these words to
who will depend on us.

I know that we are all so very busy doing our best to keep our heads above
water and I also know that many of us truly want to help others. However, I
also know that when we fail to meet our commitments it really makes things
difficult for others.

The one thing that we need to pay more attention to is this; we should also
learn to appreciate our volunteers more. For their time and their work. We
need to be mindful that we should not take our volunteers for granted nor
should we expect them to always give freely of their own time.

There is a fine line between expecting our volunteers to give freely and
then taking advantage of their time and skills.

My advice for what it is worth is this! Be careful when you commit. Make
sure that you have the time to do what you commit to. Do not over commit.
Do not expect to always get something for nothing. That is, do not expect
that someone will always be in a position to provide their time and skills
for nothing. We need to appreciate each other more.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

How a little wooden ramp reshaped an Ontario city

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

How a little wooden ramp reshaped an Ontario city
By Glyn Bowerman

TVO.org, Mar. 12, 2019

Kenora’s downtown wasn’t accessible for people with physical disabilities.
But thanks to municipal effort and some help from a Toronto-based
non-profit, its streets are changing

The small city of Kenora has a picturesque harbourfront and a shopping
district lined with turn-of-the-last-century frontier buildings. It’s pretty
as a postcard – but it had a problem. As is the case in many of Ontario’s
smaller communities, the downtown was not accessible for people with
physical disabilities.

“The buildings are older; the infrastructure is older,” says Sharon Smith, a
city councillor who serves on the city’s accessibility advisory committee.
“So it’s hard to address all of those issues.”

About 30 years ago, Smith’s brother was in an accident and had to start
using a wheelchair. He was forced to leave Kenora for Thunder Bay because he
simply couldn’t get around.

“He had to change his entire life because he had limited mobility,” says
Smith.

The city formed an accessibility committee to advise city departments about
how to meet legislated standards. In 2014, Denise Miault, a coordinator with
Community Services for Independence North West and then a member of the
committee, reached out to Luke Anderson and the StopGap Foundation.

After having been partially paralyzed in an accident in 2002, Anderson
decided to use his engineering background to develop simple solutions for
the challenges he and others faced. In 2011, he founded the non-profit
foundation, which distributes colourful custom-made ramps that make
businesses more accessible.

To date, Anderson has worked with more than 50 communities, including
Bancroft, Belleville, Port Hope, and Stratford.

“Smaller towns are more nimble,” says Anderson. “The awareness-raising
journey is much shorter than it is in a larger centre.”

A local StopGap chapter was established in Kenora to install a ramp in front
of now-councillor Mort Goss’s Second Street South shop, Sure Thing, in the
summer of 2014.

Goss says that, before the ramp was installed, there had been a five-inch
gap between the sidewalk and the door. One of his friends, who uses a
mobility device, would have to wait outside while Goss did his shopping for
him.

“It was frustrating,” says Goss. “And for him, it was pretty dehumanizing.”

The ramp had such an impact that, when it came time to spruce up Second
Street the next year as part of an ongoing downtown-revitalization process,
the city decided to make the accessibility it provided part of its built
infrastructure by raising the sidewalks. Anderson says that he’s seen
StopGap lead to policy changes in various municipalities but that Kenora is
the first to have made this kind of structural change.

“It’s a big win,” says Anderson. “That’s the ultimate dream – to inspire
that type of change.”

But many worry that such changes aren’t being implemented fast enough across
the province. The Accessibility for Ontarians With Disabilities Act, which
became law in 2005, requires that municipalities meet certain accessibility
standards, relating to everything from sidewalk widths to hiring practices,
by the year 2025.

“It doesn’t seem to be a priority,” says Miault.

Anderson is more pointed: “It’s not going to happen.”

He points to the fact that the five Standards Development Committees tasked
with outlining AODA requirements were put on hold before the last election.
Three of these committees have yet to reconvene since the Doug Ford
government came to power in June. There have been no policy announcements
from Raymond Cho, the minister for seniors and accessibility, or from the
ministry itself.

On March 8, an accessibility review of the provincial legislation and its
effectiveness – conducted by former Lieutenant-Governor David Onley and
submitted to the government on January 31 – was made public.

“The glacial pace of change over the past 14 years has left the disability
community deeply disappointed and filled with anger,” the report reads.
Among its recommendations are reactivating the standards-development
committees, making accessibility the shared responsibility of all
ministries, and introducing tax incentives for accessible retrofits, a
complaint system to report AODA violations, and new built-environment
standards.

A spokesperson for the ministry told TVO.org in an email that, as a first
step, the SDCs dedicated to healthcare and education will resume and that
the business community will be consulted: “This report has broad
implications and I will be having conversations with my colleagues about the
recommendations over the coming months.”

In the meantime, the province announced $1 million last month for phase four
of Kenora’s revitalization, which will include beautification, water and
sewer-line upgrades, and the creation of pedestrian-friendly spaces. All new
city projects, Smith says, are now developed with accessibility in mind.

Both Smith and Miault look forward to an accessible splash-pad park
scheduled to open this summer.

“It’s going to be tough,” Smith says of the 2025 deadline. “But we’re
committed to doing it.”

Glyn Bowerman is a journalist and a senior editor at Spacing.

Ontario Hubs are made possible by the Barry and Laurie Green Family
Charitable Trust & Goldie Feldman.

https://www.tvo.org/article/current-affairs/how-a-little-wooden-ramp-reshaped-an-ontario-city?utm_source=TVO&utm_campaign=bea45426b9-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_1_17
_2019_10_56_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_eadf6a4c78-bea45426b9-241842
33

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Disabled actors say they’re the ‘last civil rights movement’ in Hollywood

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe
With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Disabled actors say they’re the ‘last civil rights movement’ in Hollywood

Travis M. Andrews

The Washington Post, January 25, 2019 09:16 AM

When Santina Muha appeared on “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?” in 2007, the
producers asked which chair she’d rather use: her own, or the studio’s.

“I asked if anyone else in a wheelchair had ever been on the show,” said the
actress, who was paralyzed from the waist down in a car accident when she
was 6 years old. “They said no, so I said, ‘I’ll stay in my wheelchair.’ ”

Days after the two-part episode aired, a woman told Muha that her young son,
who also uses a wheelchair, was so inspired by seeing the actress on
television, she let him stay home from school the next day to watch the
conclusion.

“I was on TV for, like, 10 minutes, and I got fan mail from other
countries,” Muha said. “Disability needs to be normalized.”

As debates rage over what characters should appear on screen, and who should
portray them, disabilities have largely remained undiscussed. Meanwhile,
conversations concerning on-screen representations involving gender, race
and sexual orientation have gained so much traction in recent years,
A-listers have abandoned roles in response to online outrage. Scarlett
Johansson, for example, exited the upcoming drama “Rub and Tug” last year,
after being criticized for her plans to portray a transgender character.

But more than a decade after Muha’s game-show appearance, people with
disabilities remain the most proportionally underrepresented group on
screen.

The disabled are, arguably, the largest minority in America, its 56.7
million members constituting nearly 20 percent of the population, according
to the 2010 Census. But a study from the University of Southern California
Annenberg Inclusion Initiative that combed through 900 popular movies from
2007 to 2016 found that only 2.7 percent of characters with speaking roles
were portrayed as disabled.

Things are slowly changing: Last year, Dwayne Johnson played an amputee in
the action flick “Skyscraper,” and Joaquin Phoenix portrayed the late
paralyzed Portland cartoonist John Callahan in “Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get
Far on Foot.” But some advocates and actors with disabilities, such as
Maysoon Zayid, an actress with cerebral palsy, have taken issue with this
casting: They say only disabled actors should get these roles.

The latest movie to find itself in the center of the debate is “The Upside,”
a remake of the beloved French film “The Intouchables,” which hit theaters
this month. It stars Bryan Cranston as a wealthy but depressed quadriplegic
who hires a cocky former convict, now a caregiver (Kevin Hart), to assist
with his daily needs. Cranston’s character is paralyzed throughout the film,
meaning there are no flashback or dream sequences. The role would have been
perfect for a paralyzed actor, advocates say.

Early in the movie, Hart places Cranston in a wheelchair but forgets to
buckle him in. A helpless Cranston begins falling, but is caught at the last
second – a scene played entirely for laughs. The film is filled with such
scenes: Hart aggressively feeding Cranston, a cringe-worthy catheter
changing scene, Cranston crashing into waiters with his wheelchair.
Advocates have admonished the portrayal, saying it’s “dehumanizing.”

“I was disappointed to see ‘The Upside’ come out, because we, as disability
advocates, have been fighting against non-disabled actors playing visibly
disabled character for decades now,” Zayid said. “We don’t feel like
physical disability can be mimicked, can be played, can be mastered.”

Cranston defended his decision to take the role, telling the British Press
Association: “As actors, we’re asked to play other people. If I, as a
straight, older person, and I’m wealthy, I’m very fortunate, does that mean
I can’t play a person who is not wealthy, does that mean I can’t play a
homosexual? I don’t know, where does the restriction apply, where is the
line for that?” (His publicist did not issue a response to The Washington
Post’s inquiries.)

Studios often cite the need to cast famous actors to make a movie bankable,
but there aren’t many well-known disabled actors. Advocates say that’s
because disabled actors rarely get the chance to star in a movie (because
they aren’t famous). And, given the awards-bait nature of these roles –
Eddie Redmayne, Colin Firth, Daniel Day-Lewis, Dustin Hoffman, Tom Hanks, Al
Pacino and Jamie Foxx have all won Oscars in the past two decades by playing
visibly disabled characters – such roles are highly competitive.

When conversations about representation flare up and, just as quickly, die
down, there are myriad reasons: Visible disabilities often make able-bodied
people feel uncomfortable, something movie producers try to avoid. And the
disabled community doesn’t speak as one voice. As actress Christine Bruno
told The Post last year, “We are fragmented as a community because there are
all different kinds of disabilities.”

“We are the last civil rights movement of our time. Everything else has sort
of been addressed,” said Jenni Gold, a wheelchair-using director who made
“CinemAbility,” a documentary about disability in Hollywood. “In a crowd
scene, there often isn’t one person with a disability. If you don’t exist in
that world of the film, how do you exist in real life?”

The conversation today feels louder than ever. The controversy surrounding
“The Upside” even reached the ears of “The Daily Show” host Trevor Noah who
addressed it in lengthy monologue this month.

“My first instinct was … we’re going too far now. They’re actors. Actors
are gonna act,” he said. But then a wheelchair-using actor, whose name Noah
doesn’t mention, “completely opened my eyes” with something the actor wrote:
“I understand what an actor is. I too am an actor. But I’m an actor in a
wheelchair, and I never see parts that are leading roles for a person in a
wheelchair. So the one time I see a role where there’s a person in a
wheelchair, I think, ‘This could be it.’ … Because when you think about it
on the flip side, they never call people with wheelchairs in to play
able-bodied people.”

That’s what makes the casting of an actor such as Cranston in “The Upside”
so frustrating to many advocates. As Gold said, “It was a perfect role to
give someone a big break.”

Progress – however slight – is being made. Muha recently filmed an upcoming
episode of “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” in which her wheelchair was never
mentioned. Zayid has two shows in the works. Ryan O’Connell, who has
cerebral palsy, created and stars in an upcoming show on Netflix titled
“Special.” The Yale School of Drama recently teamed up with the Ruderman
Family Foundation to provide an annual scholarship for a disabled actor. Its
inaugural recipient was Jessy Yates, an actor and comedian with cerebral
palsy.

“For years, I did not think there was a place for people with visibly
disabled bodies as performers and creators, and I discounted myself from the
profession,” Yates said in a statement. “The training necessary for
sustained careers in the arts is often not accessible to the disabled
community.”

And days after the interview with Muha, “The Good Place” actress Jameela
Jamil gave an interview with the Independent, in which she said she passed
on a role to play a deaf woman, even though she was born partially deaf.

“I said it wouldn’t be appropriate for me to take that role, and they should
find a brilliant deaf woman to play that role. I think you have to make
those choices and not be too greedy and make space rather than take space,”
she told the tabloid.

As Muha said, “I think it’s very slowly getting better, because it’s a
conversation at all.”

https://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/washington-post/entertainment/disabled-a
ctors-say-they-re-the-last-civil-rights-movement-in-hollywood-1.23612449

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

No coverage for alternate format infractions

Hey everyone! I’m Christian Robicheau and I can definitely say that October
is here!
Yes indeed and the leaves have begun to change colours! I guess that the
holiday season is not far behind!
Well, it’s Thanksgiving here in Canada and we wish all Canadians a very
happy Thanksgiving!
Today I am pleased to share our president’s weekly editorial with you and
for this week Donna J. Jodhan has some very serious concerns with regard to
some entities in Ontario not being covered by the code under the Ontario
Human Rights Act when it comes to the provision of alternate formats for
documents.
We encourage you to read on!
Enjoy your weekend!

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No coverage for alternate format infractions
By Donna J. Jodhan

I guess that there are always going to be things that will catch me off
guard and an incident of this past week was no different. No; and despite
the fact that I live in a developed country where an accessible Canada Act
was recently passed, it should not come as a surprise that every now and
then I am going to stumble across some unexpected pitfalls.

This past week I was informed by an Ontario Human Rights lawyer that
Elections Ontario is not covered under the Human Rights Ontario code when it
comes to any sort of infractions that deal with the provision of documents
in alternate formats to those requiring it.

Just imagine my horrific surprise when I was told this and when I asked said
lawyer what could be done to ensure that respondents are made accountable
for the provision of documents in alternate formats to complainants
requesting said documents; I was met with silence.

This to me is not acceptable. It is a huge glitch and needs to be addressed
as soon as possible. What is most concerning is that Elections Ontario is
not obliged to provide documents in alternate formats to complainants
requesting said types of formats and this puts these types of complainants
at a gross and unacceptable disadvantage.

I can only hope that those responsible for making changes and updating the
Ontario Human Rights code will take a moment to correct this.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Disney to Produce Activity Books for the Blind

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe
With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Disney to Produce Activity Books for the Blind

JANUARY 22, 2019
Soon children with visual impairments across North America will get to find
out what Mickey Mouse “looks like” thanks to the efforts of a Windsor
couple.

Rebecca and Emmanual Blaevoet run
Tactile Vision Graphics. The shop creates greeting cards, maps, coloring
books and other publications in braille for the blind and visually impaired.

About four years ago, they got the idea to approach the Disney Corporation
to produce a series of activity books for children featuring Disney
characters. It took a year and half to put together and they just signed an
agreement the first week in January.

“We got in touch with the people at consumer products and interactive media
and they were on board,” said Rebecca Blaevoet?.

Emmanuel Blaevoet said, “They gave me access to their portal of tens of
thousands of designs. My jaw just dropped.”

The couple is contracted to produce 15 different books over three years. The
first ones are expected to be ready at the end of the month. The books will
feature the classic Disney characters such as Mickey and Minnie Mouse,
Donald Duck and Goofy. The rest will coincide with the release of new Disney
movies. Children will find puzzles, pictures to colour and other interactive
materials that can be used in schools — or just for fun — in the books.

“Teachers can develop the activities around what’s in the books, so they’ll
have three or four different kinds of activities in the same book with a
Disney theme,” said Rebecca.

The books are printed with a process that raises the pictures on the pages
so the children can feel the outlines.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE Instagram Announces That it Would Make App More
Accessible for Visually Impaired Users

“The blind user will actually be able to see, for want of a better word,
what Mickey Mouse looks like,” said Emmanuel.

The Blaevoets have the license to publish the materials for the entire North
American continent, which Rebecca estimates is a market of about 700,000
people in Canada and ten times that in the U.S.

“So now it’s just a question of getting it out to schools and libraries and
stores that sell blindness-related products and stores that sell
Disney-related products,” said Rebecca, adding that they will also be
available online.

This is the first time in Disney’s 90-year history to produce materials like
this for the blind and visually impaired, so these learning activity books
are going to be a really wonderful window into the world of Disney.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Accessibility: A source of future anxiety and a significant consideration for Canadian consumers today

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe
With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Accessibility: A source of future anxiety and a significant consideration
for Canadian consumers today

Seven-in-ten Canadians say universal accessibility should be the goal for
newly constructed buildings

January 22, 2018 – As Canada’s population grows older, millions of Canadians
find themselves worrying about decreased mobility, vision and hearing and
the impact it may have on their own lives or the lives of loved ones.

A new study from the Angus Reid Institute, conducted in partnership with the
Rick Hansen Foundation, finds more than two-thirds of Canadians expressing
concern that someone in their lives will face such challenges over the next
decade or so.

Currently, approximately three-in-ten say that accessibility is a
consideration for them when they’re thinking about which places they will go
to and which they will avoid within their communities.

This evidently creates a significant consideration for businesses and
service providers in planning accessibility infrastructure. Canadians voice
widespread support for universal accessibility policy, particularly when it
comes to new construction of buildings and homes.

It’s an issue Canadians anticipate will have a growing presence in their
lives in the coming years. Roughly the same two-thirds who voice concern
about a family member facing decreased mobility, vision, or hearing in the
future say they have the same concern about themselves.

More Key Findings:

•Approximately one-quarter of Canadians (24%) self-identify as having a
mobility, vision or hearing disability or challenge; further, 47 per cent
say they spend time with or help someone who is dealing with these
difficulties.

•Three-in-ten (28%) 35-54-year-olds say they anticipate mobility, vision or
hearing challenges arising in the next five to 10 years. This rises to 32
per cent among those ages 55 and older

•One-in-five Canadians (21%) say that knowing a business in their community
was certified as accessible would lead them to support that business more
often

•Canadians can be grouped into four distinct categories based on their
experiences with – and concern about disabilities and challenges affecting
their vision, hearing and mobility. The four groups are: The Directly
Affected (24% of the general population), Affiliated (30%), Concerned (32%),
and Unaffected (14%). Each has a unique relationship to each of the issues
canvassed in this survey

Part 1: Experiences with disability

The current landscape

The Angus Reid Institute asked Canadians if they have what they consider to
be a physical disability. Importantly, this offered respondents the
opportunity to say they have a disability outright, or to say that they have
mobility, vision or hearing challenges that make their day-to-day life more
challenging, while not identifying it as a ‘disability’.

Overall, one-in-ten (9%) say they have a disability, while another 15 per
cent state they have challenges.

As one might predict, these proportions grow with age:

The relevance of age on this issue is further illuminated when respondents
are asked about the impact of the physical challenges they face. Younger
Canadians, those between the age of 18 and 34, are much more likely to say
that the difficulties they face are minimal, while one-quarter of their
older compatriots say their physical challenges are a major hindrance. These
issues include chronic pain, difficulty walking, arthritis and more. (View
comprehensive tables for more here)

While this individual element is important to know, it is also worth
considering the full scope of mobility, vision and hearing challenges in
Canada. More than a third of Canadians (36%) have close friends of family
members who face these difficulties.

Further, those who identify as having a disability are more likely to have
family or close friends who do as well. Overall, 22 per cent of Canadians
say someone close to them has a physical disability – this rises to 54 per
cent among those who have their own disability – as shown in the graph
below:

This translates into three-in-ten Canadians who say they have a relationship
with someone who has mobility, vision or hearing challenges or a disability,
and another one-in-five who say they “rarely” see someone who fits this
criteria.

Concern for the future

Accessibility may matter to everyone, but it is not necessarily something
Canadians think about on a day-to-day basis. Thus, respondents were asked to
consider how accessibility concerns might enter their lives, if at all, in
the future. Overall, two-thirds of Canadians are at least a little concerned
about this in the coming years:

Younger people are less likely to express concern about facing mobility
challenges in the next few years, with young men especially inclined to see
themselves as invulnerable:

Similar numbers of Canadians express concern that someone else in their life
may face increased mobility challenges or other physical disabilities in the
coming years, with close to seven-in-ten (68%) at least “a bit” concerned.

Women between the ages of 35 and 54, who often find themselves in caretaker
roles for aging parents, are especially likely to say they are either
somewhat or seriously concerned about this, as seen in the graph that
follows. It’s worth noting, however, that roughly equal numbers across age
and gender groups express at least “a bit” of concern about close friends or
family members facing decreased mobility in the near future.

Four groups based on experience

Utilizing the data from these questions about Canadians’ relationship to
mobility, vision and hearing disability and physical challenges, the Angus
Reid Institute constructed four groups. For the methodology used to separate
respondents please see the end of this report. The four groups are the
Directly Affected (24% of the population), the Affiliated (30%), the
Concerned (32%), and the Unaffected (14%).

The Directly Affected are those who are dealing with a mobility, vision or
hearing disability or physical challenge themselves. The affiliated, on the
other hand, are those who do not have an issue personally, but have a close
friend or family member who does. The third group, the Concerned, fit
neither of these first two criteria, but are concerned about how these
issues will affect them in the next five to 10 years. The final group, the
Unaffected, are the 14 per cent of Canadians who say they have no
relationships and no concerns when it comes to disability issues.

The age distribution shows that all generations are affected. Perhaps
unsurprisingly, younger Canadians are more likely to be Unaffected, while
older ones are more likely to be Directly Affected:

Notably, the Directly Affected are significantly more likely to have
household incomes of below $50K, while the three additional groups share a
similar income distribution:

Part 2: Accessibility and the built environment

How accessible are our spaces?

Many Canadians take for granted the ability to access any building, event or
service anytime they want. This is not the case for those dealing with
mobility, vision or hearing challenges – even temporary ones. Indeed,
one-in-five Canadians say they often or sometimes run into temporary
accessibility challenges, whether these be injuries, carrying heavy luggage
or items, or navigating life with a stroller.

Respondents were asked to consider some of these same challenges and imagine
the experience of trying to get around parts of their community. How do
homes, restaurants, public buildings and other built environments measure up
when it comes to accessibility?

Notably, a significant number of Canadians, one-in-three (33%) say their own
homes would present difficulty to a person with a mobility, vision or
hearing challenge.

When considering the broader community, large chain stores, malls, medical
office and public buildings are perceived as easier to navigate. Smaller,
more independent stores, restaurants and other people’s homes, are seen as
having more barriers to access.

Here, Canadians who are more closely acquainted with disability are also
more likely to perceive these areas as posing accessibility challenges. The
Unaffected are noticeably less concerned on each:

And what about those places where many Canadians spend the bulk of their
time outside of the home? Among those who currently work or go to school,
approximately four-in-five say buildings are easy for anyone to access. This
ratio holds across the four groups, though it’s worth noting that the
question was only asked of those who are currently working or going to
school. Anyone with challenges significant enough to prevent working or
seeking education outside the home may have a different perspective on the
accessibility of a typical school or workplace.

Main challenges of inaccessible spaces

Overall, three-in-ten Canadians – the equivalent of roughly 9 million adults
– say that accessibility is a consideration for them when they’re thinking
about which places they will go to and which they will avoid. This creates a
significant consideration for the businesses and service providers in
planning accessibility infrastructure:

This is apparently a consideration even for homeowners whose friends may
view their property as inaccessible. Indeed, when those who say
accessibility is a concern are asked which buildings or areas they avoid,
other people’s houses tops the list, with small businesses close behind:

This data also offer a window into what can be done to address these
problems. The most common issues cited by those who avoid certain places are
seen in the following graph:

Future challenges anticipated

While one-in-three Canadians (33%) currently say they have issues getting
around their own home, a full majority say that they are anticipating
challenges moving around at home in decades to come. Asked to look 10 to 15
years down the road, more than half say they are at least occasionally
concerned about what their mobility may look like for themselves and their
family:

Many are taking proactive measures to get ahead of any potential problem. In
fact, close to four-in-ten (37%) say they have already made changes or plan
to, in anticipation of future accessibility challenges. The Directly
Affected are more likely to have done each of these actions than the three
other groups:

While future anxiety is evidently held by a significant number of Canadians,
it is also worth noting that slightly more than half say that they see
accessibility being continually improved in their communities. Some 53 per
cent say their community is making incremental progress, though a
substantial proportion say they have not been seeing much improvement (39%):

Part 3: The policy environment

Low awareness of current accessibility rules

Currently, Canadian accessibility standards vary from city to city and
province to province. Because of this, the survey asked respondents to share
their familiarity with the rules in place where they live.

Most Canadians know relatively little about accessibility standards in their
city or town. Only one-in-ten (10%) say they are “quite familiar” with the
regulations where they live, and fully four-in-ten (40%) say they know only
that such rules exist.

Interestingly, this lack of familiarity extends across the four experience
groups relatively evenly. Those who have a mobility, vision or hearing
disability or physical challenge themselves are not markedly more likely to
profess a deep knowledge of local accessibility standards than those in the
Unaffected group:

Perhaps as a result of this lack of familiarity with local accessibility
standards, Canadians tend to see such rules in their communities as “about
right overall” (39%) or are unsure about what rating they would give (31%).

A large driver of opinion on accessibility regulations where one lives is
knowledge of the regulations in question, as seen in the graph that follows.

In general, Canadians view a lack of accessibility in the built environment
more as a product of cost concerns than as the result of lax regulation or
enforcement:

Universal access, uniform standards

Since ARI and RHF first asked in 2015, Canadians have consistently said
their country should be aiming for universal accessibility whenever
possible.

Researchers included a follow-up question in this 2018 survey, asking
respondents to use the same scale to describe the level of accessibility
that should be the goal for new construction versus existing buildings.

As might be expected, significantly larger numbers say universal access
should be required in new buildings, while fewer say this about existing
spaces that may have been built a long time ago:

The desire for universality going forward can be seen in responses to
another question from this survey, this one about accessibility legislation
and whether there should be a uniform standard for accessibility across
Canada.

Slightly more than half of Canadians (54%) say there should be “one uniform
set of rules for accessibility across Canada,” while roughly one-in-three
(32%) say “different regions may have different needs and should be able to
set their own rules for accessibility. The rest (13%) are unsure.

There were some significant regional response differences to this question,
specifically between Alberta – where more people place themselves on the
local control side of this question – and other provinces:

Regarding accessibility-related upgrades for existing buildings, Canadians
were of the opinion that if government mandates the upgrade then it should
help pay the cost. Nearly half (45%) say governments and building owners
should split the financial burden of renovation evenly, while only
one-in-ten (11%) would place the onus completely on building owners:

Accessibility certification seen as worthwhile

As was the case in 2016, when the Angus Reid Institute assessed Canadian
opinions regarding the creation of a program in Canada similar to LEED – the
U.S.-based Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design system that rates
buildings based on their energy efficiency and environmental sustainability
– for accessibility, Canadians overwhelmingly see a certification program
like this as “worthwhile”.

This year, Canadians were asked specifically about the Rick Hansen
Foundation Accessibility Certification (RHFAC). While just 16 per cent say
they are aware of the program currently, the idea is viewed positively by
nearly all respondents. Nine-in-ten Canadians (91%) say the program would be
worthwhile:

Further, large numbers say they would find a certified accessible home
“appealing” if they were looking for a new place to live. The comfort of
knowing that their new home is given RHFAC approval is evidently appealing
to three of the four groups, based on their mindset toward accessibility.
More than seven-in-ten from the Directly Affected, Affiliated and Concerned
say this, while the Unaffected are split evenly:

Overall, one-in-five (21%) also say that this accessibility certification
would impact their shopping habits. This group says that if they knew a
business in their community had been certified as accessible, they would try
to give more of their business to that store. The proportion saying this
rises to one-in-three (33%) among the Directly Affected:

The Angus Reid Institute (ARI) was founded in October 2014 by pollster and
sociologist, Dr. Angus Reid. ARI is a national, not-for-profit, non-partisan
public opinion research foundation established to advance education by
commissioning, conducting and disseminating to the public accessible and
impartial statistical data, research and policy analysis on economics,
political science, philanthropy, public administration, domestic and
international affairs and other socio-economic issues of importance to
Canada and its world.

Pour la version française, cliquez ici

For detailed results by age, gender, region, education, and other
demographics, click here.

For detailed results by the four groups, click here.

Click here for the full report including tables and methodology

Click here for the questionnaire used in this survey

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Shachi Kurl, Executive Director, Angus Reid Institute: 604.908.1693
shachi.kurl@angusreid.org @shachikurl

Dave Korzinski, Research Associate: 250.899.0821
dave.korzinski@angusreid.org

Ian Holliday, Research Associate: 604.442.3312 ian.holliday@angusreid.org

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in communities where they live

Rick Hansen discusses ARI poll on disability and accessibility on Canada AM

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Accessibility: A source of future anxiety and a significant consideration for Canadian consumers today

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Living with the cards dealt to us

Welcome to the month of October and I’m Scott savoy wishing everyone a happy
weekend.
Well, fall is here finally and it is probably my favourite season of the
year! Why? Because I know that the holiday season is just around the
corner!
We are delighted to wish our Canadian ffriends and family a very, very happy
Thanksgiving!
Happy Thanksgiving Canada!
Today I am pleased to share our president’s editorial with you and for this
week Donna J. Jodhan talks about living with the cards being dealt to us.
Happy weekend everyone!

+++++++++++++++

Living with the cards dealt to us
By Donna J. Jodhan

It is my true belief that when we learn to accept the cards that have been
dealt to us; then this would be the time when we are able to truly accept
who we are and to concentrate on gathering and using the necessary resources
in order to be happy and content.

For discovering who we really are is probably one of the most important
pillars to leading a fulfilling life. As soon as we discover our true inner
identity then I think that we are then ready to embark on a meaningful
existence. If we are unable to accept the cards that have been dealt to us
then we would not be able to discover our true identity and if we cannot
discover our true identity then we will probably continue to flounder and
stay lost.

We do not have any choice when it comes to the cards that we have been
dealt. That is, we do not choose our parents and our family and we do not
choose the circumstances of our birth. We do not choose the financial
circumstances into which we are born; to rich parents, to parents who are
poor financially, or parents who are hard working or to those who live lives
of crime and unfortunate situations.

We do not choose whether or not we are born healthy or with or without a
disability. We do not choose our country or city of birth nor do we have
any control as to what race we are at birth, our ethnicity, or our
appearance.

These are the cards that we are dealt and the ones over which we have no
control. However from here on in, and as soon as we are able to think and
reason for ourselves, the cards that we choose are the ones that will
determine our fate and destiny. Of course; fate may sometimes play tricks
on us and throw us unexpected curve balls which would force us to depend on
the cards that we have been dealt in order to swim and not sink.

Just my two cents for today.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan wishing you a terrific weekend.
To reach me, please send an email to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Here is a complete list of where you can view Donna’s blogs and editorials.
Donna Jodhan! Advocating accessibility for all
http://www.donnajodhan.blogspot.com
Weekly features on how to increase your success with your business ventures
http://www.sterlingcreations.com/businessdesk.htm
Weekly articles and editorials on issues about accessibility
http://www.sterlingcreations.ca/blog
Learn more about Author Donna Jodhan and her campaign against bullying at
www.jodhanmysterybook.club
Now you can enjoy Donna’s detective DJ crime crushers Series by visiting
http://www.donnajodhan.com

And now her weekly podcast at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html
From recipes to apps, and from 5 minutes mysteries to tips for entrepreneurs
and alerts on the latest scams
Available for download from iTunes and Google music play.

You can follow me on twitter @accessibleworld
and chat with me on Skype at habsfan0526.
Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Now you can subscribe to my monthly newsletter.
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

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10 things you probably don’t know about braille infographic

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe
With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

10 things you probably don’t know about braille infographic

Braille is named after its creator, Louis
Braille, and uses combinations of
raised dots to spell out letters and
punctuation. Around the world,
people who are blind read braille with
their fingertips and can write it using
devices like the
Perkins Brailler
. But
that’s not the whole story about
braille. For example…
Braille started out as a
military
code
called “night writing.” It was developed in 1819 by the French army so
soldiers
could communicate at night without speaking or using candles.
Fifteen-year-old
French schoolboy Louis Braille learned about the code, and eventually
developed the
more usable, streamlined version of the braille alphabet we know today.
There’s an
asteroid named Braille
. In 1999, NASA’s Deep Space 1 probe flew past an asteroid
while on its way to photograph the Borrelly comet. NASA named the asteroid
“9969 Braille”
in honor of Louis Braille.
Braille takes up more space than the traditional alphabet, so
braille books are much
larger than their print counterparts
. “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire” is 10
volumes in braille, the “New American Bible’’ is 45 volumes and “Webster’s
Unabridged Dictionary” is a shelf-hogging 72 volumes.
Braille is not a language
. It’s a tactile alphabet that can be used to write almost any
language. There are braille versions of Chinese, Spanish, Arabic, Hebrew and
many
other languages.
Most people who are blind
don’t know braille
. In 2009, National Federation of the
Blind cited statistics indicating that only 10 percent of Americans with
blindness can
read braille. That number has been falling as more people with visual
impairments use
audio books, voice-recognition software and other technology to read and
write.
However, the same study found that braille-literate people are more likely
to attain
higher levels of education and be employed.
There’s a braille “Olympics.” It’s the annual
Braille Challenge
for students who are
blind, sponsored by the Los Angeles-based Braille Institute. More than 1,400
students
from the U.S. and Canada test their braille skills in categories like
reading
comprehension, proofreading and spelling. Winners in each age group walk
away
with monetary prizes – and braille bragging rights for a year.
Just because you’re blind doesn’t mean you don’t have to learn math. There’s
a special vers
ion of braille just for mathematics called the
Nemeth Code
. It was invented by Dr.
Abraham Nemeth and can be used to transcribe math, algebra and calculus.
Braille is the surprise plot twist in the 2010 movie “The Book of Eli.” In
the movie, Denz
el Washington plays a loner who wanders through a violent post-apocalyptic
wast
eland with the last known copy of the Bible. At the end, you find out that
the
Bible is in braille
and Washington’s character is blind.
There are two versions of braille –
contracted and uncontracted
. In uncontracted
braille, every word is spelled out. Contracted braille is a “shorthand”
version where
common words are abbreviated, much like “don’t” is a shorter version of “do”
and
“not.” Most kids start with uncontracted braille and then learn the
contracted version.
There’s a good reason why
braille is on the keypad buttons of drive-through ATMs
. The
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that all ATMs must be
accessible to
people with visual impairments, and drive-through ATMs aren’t exempt. That’s
so
passengers who are blind, travelling in the back seat of cars or taxis, can
reach the
ATM and independently make a transaction without assistance from the driver.
10 things you probably don’t know about braille infographic
Read more about:
Braille & Literacy
https://www.perkins.org/stories/10-things-you-probably-dont-know-about-braille

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Valuing the Voice of People Living with Disabilities in Manitoba

Hello there and welcome to our newest segment: Where we highlight important
articles on topics pertaining to advocacy.

We are introducing this segment based on several requests that we have
received from readers.
Please feel free to send us your feedback and if you wish us to publish your
own articles then by all means send it along to info@sterlingcreations.ca

Please take a moment to subscribe to our newest newsletter:
‘Let’s Talk Tips’ is your monthly resource for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

With best wishes
From the business desk team
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Valuing the Voice of People Living with Disabilities in Manitoba

By Carlos Sosa

Policy Alternatives, Jan. 17, 2019

Recently the Manitoba Government made a decision to reject a core funding
application from the Manitoba League of Persons with Disabilities (MLPD) for
the 2018-19 fiscal year. It can be very difficult for an organization to
function without core funding which diminishes its capacity. The
organization (formally known as the Manitoba League of the Physically
Handicapped) has existed since 1974 as a consumer-based organization of
people living with disabilities. MLPD emerged in the era of the civil rights
movement in which people with disabilities were often left out of policy
decisions affecting their lives.

In Manitoba, especially within Winnipeg, people with disabilities began to
organize around the need for an accessible transportation system and a voice
in the services that they utilized. By coming together, people with
disabilities were empowered to take action in their own communities for the
betterment of society.

People Living with Disabilities have an employment rate of 59.4 percent
compared to those without disabilities at 80.1 percent. The disability
community is made of 175,000 people or one in six of the Manitoba
Population. People with Disabilities make up 35 percent of Employment and
Income Assistance caseload at 25,407 cases out of 71,977. A significant
percentage of people with disabilities live disproportionally in poverty.

People with Disabilities lack financial resources to support their own
advocacy groups. Governments have a responsibility to ensure that voices of
marginalized populations are being regularly consulted and that their voice
are at the table when it comes to the development of policies that affect
the disability community on a daily basis.

Over the last 40 years the disability community has influenced the
development of many services and policies which have led to the elimination
of barriers and the creation of more employment opportunities for people
living with disabilities in our province. Reaching E-quality Employment
Services, the Independent Living Resource Centre, Self Managed Attendant
Care, the Vulnerable Persons Act, Accessible Taxi Services and the creation
of Handi-Transit would not have been possible without having the voice of
people with disabilities at the table working to develop solutions
collaboratively with community and government.

Today the voice of people with disabilities is still critical especially
with many of the most recent changes in healthcare, education, housing,
transportation, and employment and income assistance which all have an
impact on the disability community. With the Government of Manitoba’s
commitment to implementing the Accessibility for Manitobans Act and its work
to develop an Employment First Strategy for People Living with Disabilities;
it is critically important the voices of People Living with Disabilities are
at the table providing a lived experience perspective.

It is my hope that the Government of Manitoba will reconsider its position
and value the voice of people living with disabilities at the table working
collaboratively in the development of services and policies that help to
further enhance the betterment of our community.

Carlos Sosa is a graduate of the University of Winnipeg, a member of the
Board of Inclusion Winnipeg as their Advocacy Chairperson and a past
Co-chair of the Manitoba League of Persons with Disabilities

https://policyfix.ca/2019/01/17/valuing-the-voice-of-people-living-with-disabilities-in-manitoba/

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